Blogbeitrag

Using HR and IT Collaboration to Improve Talent Management

Steve Dobberowsky

Director, Strategy and Value Service, Cornerstone

This piece originally appeared on the ATD blog.

Human Resources and IT departments haven't historically been closely linked or aligned within an organization. But as technology continues its rapid evolution, this partnership will become more important than ever. Already, 33 percent of HR teams are using some form of artificial intelligence (AI) technology and 41 percent are building mobile apps to deliver HR solutions, according to Deloitte's 2017 Global Human Capital Trends report—IT teams are crucial for implementing both.

Increasingly, technology also plays a key role in helping HR leaders make strategic hiring decisions, deliver just-in-time learning, and automate previously time-consuming processes. Support from IT can make these goals a reality, but it can be hard to come by, particularly for federal agencies that rely on grant programs or federal funding for tech maintenance and upgrades.

Each year, the federal government spends some $80 billion on IT systems, the majority of which goes to updating outdated, legacy systems instead of investing in new tools to benefit departments like HR. But not all government agencies are guilty of this misstep. The Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA), Air Force, and Security and Exchange Commission(SEC) have been able to effectively align their IT and HR teams behind common goals, such as recruitment.

FederalNewsRadio.com took a look at how the chief human capital officers at these agencies were able to bring their HR and IT departments together in a series of articles called The Intersection Between HR and IT.

Automating Recruitment

Cathy Ganey, director of the Office of Human Resources, and Adriane Burton, chief information officer at the HRSA, are making recruitment and retention a priority together. To bring in qualified hires, Ganey's team holds a "pre-consult meeting" with hiring managers to review position descriptions and discuss specific needs.

Ganey admits that it was hard to get hiring managers on board at first, but once they saw the quality of candidates coming to them, they were sold. "We can sit down with the hiring managers and actually make decisions based on data moving forward," she says. "This has really changed the way we do recruitment."

Burton's team, meanwhile, has implemented automated systems that track the hiring process and generate a real-time recruitment report. The system analyzes data such as time-to-hire, which enables Ganey's team to pinpoint delays in the recruitment process and make informed decisions moving forward.

Using Data-Based Hiring Tactics

In the coming year alone, the Air Force expects to hire 1,400 new employees—no small feat. To do this, the Air Force is using a combination of traditional recruiting methods paired with cutting edge big data analytics.

"We're trying to expand our view—our ability to reach into the talent pool across the entire United States—and big data will help us do that," explains Jeff Mayo, deputy assistant secretary of the Air Force for force management integration. "The analytics, the niche targeting that goes along with that, are tools that we are trying to add to our toolbox for how we can reach this very specialized talent."

The organization is currently running a test in the New England region with the goal of identifying new recruitment areas. Bill Marion, Air Force deputy chief information officer and his team recently unified recruiters on a common contact management system to help Mayo's team of recruiters streamline and target their outreach based on geographic data. For example, zoning in on talent at the Collegiate Cyber Defense Competition recently resulted in 250 new registrants in their system.

"The number of recruiters we have is fairly limited, so we need to use some analytical tools—and take advantage of the data that we have—to minimize that search effort, to hone us in on the specific individuals that we're looking for," Mayo explains.

Designing Future-Friendly Systems

At the SEC, Chief Information Officer Pam Dyson and Chief Human Capital Officer Lacey Dingman are working together to deploy two major human capital systems: a comprehensive Enterprise Talent Management System (ETMS) and a self-service HR system.

The HR self-service model will bring consistency to the way HR answers employees' questions and distributes information and alleviate the demand on staff, Dingman says. The ETMS, meanwhile, is an end-to-end portal for anything that workers might need throughout an employee lifecycle that will also help HR teams provide workforce support.

Throughout the deployment process of these two systems, Dyson and Dingman have strived towards flexibility, basing their decisions on what will work best in the future. "Having raw data stored in our [enterprise data warehouse] gives us a lot of leverage, opportunities and options for how we want to continue to modernize and enhance this overall lifecycle talent management system for the agency," Dyson says.

Both HR and IT teams have been involved in development since day one and have prioritized ways to become more agile. For example, they are now considering new ways staff may need to access these systems, either remotely or via smartphones. To that end, they are examining a future move to the cloud.

In order to thoroughly understand and support workforce needs across their organizations, it is essential for HR leaders like Ganey, Mayo and Dingman to have access to updated workforce management systems and data. Innovative partnerships with IT leaders like Burton, Marion and Dyson can lead to more efficient and effective workforce management, allowing government agencies to attract, manage and develop the talent they need for the future.

Photo: Creative Commons

Related Resources

Want to keep learning? Explore our products, customer stories, and the latest industry insights.

Wann sind Arbeitsbedingungen wirklich flexibel?

Blogbeitrag

Wann sind Arbeitsbedingungen wirklich flexibel?

Nicht erst seit der Corona-Pandemie in den Jahren 2020 bis 2022 stellt sich für viele Unternehmen die Frage nach der Flexibilisierung von Arbeitsort und Arbeitszeit. Aber gerade jetzt stehen Unternehmen vor der besonderen Herausforderung, wie sie mit dem Thema Homeoffice umgehen wollen. Es scheint eine große Unsicherheit in dieser Frage zu geben. Man rätselt, wie Mitarbeiterinnen und Mitarbeiter zurück ins Büro geholt werden können und ob dies überhaupt als sinnvoll erscheint. Hier gehen die Meinungen weit auseinander. Nun stelle man sich in einem kleinem Gedankenexperiment folgende Situation vor. Ein Unternehmen entschließt sich dazu, die Frage nach der Flexibilität von Arbeitszeit und Arbeitsort den Teams zu überlassen: „Ihr entscheidet selbst, wie Ihr die Dinge handhaben wollt und was für Euch als sinnvoll erscheint. Findet eine Regel für Euch und handelt danach. Wir erwarten nur, dass Ihr Euch irgendwie einigt“. Ein Team folgt dem Aufruf, stimmt sich ab. Unterschiedliche Aspekte werden in Erwägung gezogen und man kommt nach einer intensiven Debatte zu der gemeinsamen Einigung, dass alle Mitglieder des Teams jeden Tag von 9 bis 16 Uhr im Office erscheinen. Würden wir in diesem Fall von flexiblen Arbeitsbedingungen sprechen? Die Antwort lautet: Ja. Schließlich konnten die Mitglieder des Teams frei und flexibel entscheiden, wie sie es haben wollen. Die Antwort lautet aber zugleich: Nein. Offensichtlich haben hat sich das Team für feste Arbeitszeiten im Office entschieden. Was jetzt? Haben wir es hier mit einem Paradox zu tun? Die Lösung dieses logischen Problems liegt in der Unterscheidung zweier Arten von Regeln. Es gibt die Regel erster Ordnung. Sie beschreibt, wie die Dinge tatsächlich geregelt sind. Im hier beschriebenen Fall sind die Arbeitszeiten ganz offensichtlich fest geregelt. Die Mitarbeiterinnen und Mitarbeiter erscheinen jeden Tag von 9 bis 16 im Office. Dann gibt es die Regel zweiter Ordnung. Sie regelt, wer die Regeln wie aufstellt. In gewisser Weise ist dies eine Metaregel – eine Regel über den Umgang mit Regeln. Das klingt zugegebenermaßen etwas philosophisch, ist aber äußerst praktisch. Im hier beschriebenen Gedankenexperiment entscheiden die Mitarbeiterinnen und Mitarbeiter selbst über die Regeln. Es könnte auch die Geschäftsführung sein oder eine andere Autorität innerhalb des Unternehmens. Führt man diesen Gedanken fort, gelangt man zu vier, einfachen Konstellationen. Erstens, das Unternehmen entscheidet über die Arbeitsbedingungen und legt fest, dass die Mitarbeiter zu festen Zeiten an einem festen Ort sein müssen. Das ist die klassische, eher paternalistische Variante. Zweitens, das Unternehmen entscheidet über die Arbeitsbedingungen und räumt der Belegschaft ein hohes Maß an Selbstbestimmung ein – „Ihr könnt arbeiten wo und wann Ihr wollt“. Das wäre Arbeitsflexibilität nach Gutsherrenart. Die Mitarbeiter dürfen selbst bestimmten, weil es eine übergeordnete Autorität ihnen gnädig erlaubt. Drittens, die Mitarbeiter bestimmen selbst über die Flexibilität ihrer Arbeitsbedingungen und sie entscheiden sich für feste Arbeitszeiten und feste Arbeitsorte. Dies ist der im obigen Gedankenexperiment beschriebene Fall, eine Art selbstbestimmte Fixiertheit. Viertens, die Mitarbeiter bestimmten selbst über die Flexibilität ihrer Arbeitsbedingungen und sie entscheiden sich für Selbstbestimmtheit. Verfolgt man die öffentliche Diskussion rund um das Thema Arbeitsflexibilität und Homeoffice, dann scheinen die ersten beiden Konstellationen implizit im Raum zu stehen. Reflexartig geht man davon aus, dass das Unternehmen, der Betriebsrat oder irgendeine andere Autorität über die Arbeitsbedingungen der Mitarbeiterinnen und Mitarbeiter entscheidet. Auf ihren Schultern ruht die Verantwortung. Was ergibt Sinn? Wie können wir (die Autorität) es den Mitarbeitern recht machen? Wie gehen wir mit der Vielfalt individueller Präferenzen um? Wo ist der gemeinsame Nenner? Auf diese Fragen gibt es allerdings keine Antwort, die für alle Betroffenen, einschließlich der Kunden und Lieferanten zufriedenstellend sein wird. Zu vielfältig sind die Rahmenbedingungen, die Aufgaben, Anforderungen, Lebenssituationen etc. Vermutlich kann man die Frage nach der richtigen und sinnvollen Flexibilisierung der Arbeit nicht für alle Mitarbeiter lösen, wenn man nur die Regel erster Ordnung in Betracht zieht. Entscheidend ist die Frage, wer, wie über die Regeln entscheidet, also die Regel zweiter Ordnung. Dies führt zu einer gänzlich anderen Diskussion und zu anderen Schlussfolgerung als das Problem, wie man Dinge am Ende für Alle gleichermaßen regeln soll. Einfach ist diese Diskussion nicht. Wollen wir es einfach den Mitarbeitern selbst überlassen oder braucht es eine Ansage „von oben“? Am Ende bedeutet echte Arbeitsflexibilität, die Arbeitsbedingungen den Teams zu überlassen, worauf immer sie sich einigen.

HR heute – Reicht der Obstkorb noch? Was müssen wir noch alles bieten?

On-Demand-Webinar

Video

HR heute – Reicht der Obstkorb noch? Was müssen wir noch alles bieten?

Im Zuge des an Dramatik zunehmenden Fachkräftemangels und befeuert durch die Erfahrungen während der Corona-Pandemie scheinen die Erwartungen der Mitarbeitenden an ihre Arbeitgeber drastisch zu steigen. Für Arbeitgeber stellt sich daher die brennende Frage, was sie bieten müssen, um Mitarbeitende zu gewinnen und zu halten. Wir stellen Ihnen zusamnmen mit Prof. Dr. Armin Trost einen strategischen Rahmen vor, Ihnen hilft, sich im Wettrüsten um attraktive Arbeitsbedingungen zu positionieren: •Was bedeutet es, ein attraktiver Arbeitgeber zu sein und wie sehr kommt es auf einzelne Aspekte, wie Homeoffice, Weiterbildungsmöglichkeiten, Gehalt, Führung etc. an? •Was müssen Arbeitgeber bieten und was dürfen sie fordern? •Wie authentisch sollte das Arbeitgeberversprechen sein, vor allem dann, wenn die Arbeitsbedingungen weniger attraktiv sind? •Welche Rolle spielen Lernen, Entwicklung und die aktive Gestaltung der Arbeitswelt durch die Mitarbeitenden? •Was ist die Rolle von HR und des Fachbereichs? Wie können die Verantwortlichkeiten beider Seiten balanciert werden? Nutzen Sie die Möglichkeit, um Impulse zur Gestaltung der neuen Arbeitswelt zu erhalten

Übersicht über die Cornerstone Talent Management Suite

Video

Übersicht über die Cornerstone Talent Management Suite

In diesem Video bekommen Sie einen kurzen Überblick über die gesamte Cornerstone Talent Management-Lösung.

Vereinbaren Sie ein persönliches Gespräch

Sprechen Sie mit unseren Cornerstone-Expert:innen und erfahren Sie, wie wir Ihnen bei Ihren individuellen Anforderungen in puncto Personalmanagement helfen können.

© Cornerstone 2022
Impressum