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Editor's Note: This post is part of our "Cartoon Coffee Break" series. While we take talent management seriously, we also know it's important to have a good laugh. Check back regularly for a new ReWork cartoon.

When the coronavirus pandemic shuttered offices around the United States in March, most people thought it would only be a short hiatus. And then weeks turned into months. Today, the virus is still surging in some parts of the country and now, a growing number of employers, including tech companies like Amazon, Uber, Airbnb and Slack, are delaying return-to-office dates—once again—to mid-2021.

Many company leaders have started asking other questions like: Do my employees actually need an office building? Should we keep the lease on our office building? 

While some companies are planning to do away with offices altogether, others still anticipate returning in some form. But with 43% of employees interested in working from home more often, these companies will likely have to rethink the purpose of their office space. 

As a result, organizations are turning to additional options. Some are investigating new operating models once employees do eventually return to the office—others are exploring the discounted prices that many major cities, like New York City, are currently offering. Many have no option but to continue with their current office space, since office leases in most major cities are very difficult to end early and tend to last for years.  

In the meantime, only a small percentage of employees are back in the office. Most buildings still stand unused, empty—and a little eerie. 

To start planning for the post-pandemic workplace, check out this ReWork piece from Cornerstone’s CTO Mark Goldin for some related tips and insights.