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Jason Corsello, our special good buddy, credits his HR colleagues with some sound predictions for the year ahead. But what’s missing, he cautions, is some much-needed perspective.

“[M]ore often than not, the grandiose thoughts we all wrap with a pretty bow for the new year never really pan out the way we hope they will," writes Corsello on Human Capitalist.

Here, Corsello sheds some “realistic light” on what many HR experts predict will happen in 2014:

Technology Isn't a Job Killer

  • Prediction: Technology is rendering many HR jobs obsolete.
  • Reality: "[T]echnologies will transform HR jobs, not remove them. This isn’t to say HR folks weren’t doing their jobs before, but with the help of new technologies, the growth of skills and the depth of reach for HR professionals previously swamped with paperwork and a difficulty connecting with talent will increase."

There’s a New Way to Narrow the 'Skills Gap' 

  • Prediction: The gap between what educators are delivering and what today's modern workforce needs will close.
  • Reality: No it won't. "Instead of hiring for experience in 2014, let’s hire for learnability," writes Corsello. "Why not teach them rather than dismiss them as unqualified?"

Wearable Tech Is a Personal — not HR —Trend

  • Prediction: Wearable computers are coming to HR departments.
  • Reality: "As HR tech is still being adopted on more traditional devices like PCs and mobile, jumping right to wearable because people are talking about it right now is a mistake. The groundwork needs to be solid before companies invest in the extra bells and whistles."

Face-Time with Remote Workers Still Matters

  • Prediction: New technologies will help remote workers retain a sense of culture and community.
  • Reality: "While I don't doubt these technologies will help, I do think that HR teams will have to work much harder to maintain a sense of culture and community for remote workers...discounting in-person company interaction could be a mistake."

Read more at Human Capitalist.