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Like it or not, smartphones have become a necessary (if not addictive) part of our everyday work and personal lives. From email to social media to text messaging and Facetime, "if we’re honest," says Jason Corsello, vice president of Cornerstone OnDemand, "these pocket-sized computers are a huge part of the way we live and, similarly, the way we work." Mobile devices have completely transformed the way that we communicate, creating opportunities to increase productivity but also introducing more distractions to our time-crunched lives. Now that BYOD has become an integral part of many businesses, how should companies tackle mobile management to get the most out of their mobility programs?

According to Corsello, when it comes to mobility management, "Too many companies split responsibilities among the IT department (to deal with tech issues), the finance department (to help pay the bill), and the employee (to own the device)." However, it's important that companies develop a deeper understanding of mobile behavior as well as tracking these three departmental areas in order to optimize their mobile programs. 

The Multi-Platform, Mobile Workforce 

"Mobility management is an increasingly different challenge from the days of early data devices (see: BlackBerry’s first model)," Corsello says. "As such, mobile programs are no longer limited to a handful of executives, all using the same phone, covered by one of three voice plans on the same carrier." Employees now carry an array of mobile devices that use multiple platforms (iOS, Windows and Android), data and voice plans. According to research from CIO, mobility managers today oversee an average of 1.5 devices per employee. Corsello notes, "What’s more, mobile data and the explosion of cloud applications have quite literally turned smartphones into computers, connecting people with calendars, contacts, work applications and the information they need to do their jobs from anywhere."

The Details Are in the Data

An eMarketer study found there will be 4.55 billion mobile users worldwide this year — meaning that there will be no shortage of data being exchanged between all of these devices. This presents an important opportunity for businesses. "Deciphering data can be confusing, but utilizing data software, for example, can help you understand what applications your employees are using and how they are engaging with one another on their devices," Corsello says. "It can even be a money saver, if you’re able to cut back on mobile initiatives that aren’t useful or engaging for employees." Companies that want to build productive, more connected and collaborative company cultures will have a strong lead over their competitors if they take advantage of the mobile data available to them. Corsello adds, "Companies need to take the time to dive deeper than the device itself if they really want to know their workforce."

H/T Human Capitalist

Photo: Can Stock