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Many organizations face a leadership gap and cannot find the talent needed to grow. We could blame the retiring baby boomer phenomenon, the free agent nation, or the lack of investment made in developing leaders. But since blame is a lazy man’s wage, I will not entertain that debate because there are too many options out there for developing leaders.   

There are many leadership development programs in the market. In minutes, with a simple Internet search or over coffee with your head of human resources, you can discover myriad high-quality leadership development programs that you could use in your organization to develop leaders. The problem is not finding a good program, but in choosing one.   

Answer the Right Questions

So how does one choose?  

The problem we face in evaluating leadership development programs is that we get caught up in evaluating the content rather than asking a simple question, “What do we want our leaders to be able to do?” Each organization is unique in how it answers this question. And that is where the secret lies. If an organization can select a program that matches the answer to the question above, the selected program will likely be the right one.   

After all, each leadership development program is very good in some way. It is not so important which one you select. It is important that you use the one you select. In other words, the key is to not let it become another un-opened binder on the bookshelves of your management team.  

Be An Effective Leader

Let me give you an example: If an organization’s answer to the question above is, “We want our leaders to be proactive and focused on the things that drive results,” your choices are narrowed down to only a few programs that would deliver on that answer. And if I had to pick one program that would deliver on that answer, without hesitation, I would choose, “The Effective Executive” by Peter F. Drucker. It is a classic, and all five of the behaviors of effective executives taught in the book remain vital skills that any leader should practice if he or she wants to be effective in his or her organization.  

In the book, Drucker teaches that effective executives:

  1. Know where their time goes
  2. Focus on contribution and results
  3. Build on strengths
  4. Concentrate on first things first
  5. Make effective decisions

This is not a book review or a plug for “The Effective Executive,” though I do believe if you had to choose one set of skills to teach your leadership, it would be the five from Drucker’s book. This is a challenge for every organization to simplify the selection of leadership development programs, and ask, “What do we want our leaders to be able to do?”  

Answering this question clearly will help you choose the right program. After all, many programs are excellent. The secret to success is not in which program you choose, but that you get people to apply the program you choose.

Photo: Can Stock