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It's Time for Diversity Training to Evolve

Publicación de blog

It's Time for Diversity Training to Evolve

I was perusing Fast Company recently when an article caught my eye. The piece challenged the effectiveness of diversity policies and training in many companies. As a matter of fact, it went so far as to say that many of them are backfiring. In brief, a group of researchers from the University of California, Santa Barbara and University of Washington found that white men felt threatened by pro-diversity initiatives. What's more, citing a longitudinal study of more than 700 U.S. companies, they discovered that not only were programs aimed at reducing racial bias among the management group less effective, but also that some weren't successful at convincing underrepresented minorities that they would be treated more fairly. I say this in my book, Unleashing Capacity: The Hidden Human Resources, a lot, but it bears repeating, "It's not about the model, it's the mindset." Merely posting policies as a blanket warning isn't effective in creating inclusion for all. It is only going to work if you work on it, so consider delivering and reinforcing diversity in a manner that creates universal accountability. Here are three suggestions on how to accomplish just that: 1) Focus on Collaboration Without Bias I'll be quite blunt here: The world is rapidly becoming widely diverse, with people of color comprising much of the population at large. Diversity training is meant to reinforce that we should all be able to work together to accomplish our goals, regardless of differences. The more you can consistently deliver on this common-sense approach without calling out white males or alienating minority groups, the better the training will work. It's about collaboration without bias, education without prejudice and the advancement of the corporation without tearing it apart from the inside due to cultural concerns. Everyone from the CEO on down must drive this message home, and it must be a part of the daily culture with reinforcement from training when necessary. 2) Embrace Diversity In Your Own Organization The populations meant to be served by diversity training must see evidence of it in the workplace. The management population must be diverse. There must be diversity of thought, reward for ideas and an embrace of different cultures, experiences, languages and histories. Ensuring that your leadership reflects your diversity program is just good business, and it sends strong message to the employees and the market that you believe in progress as practice 3) Reward Self-Directed Progress The Fast Company article mentions the success of PwC's 4REAL diversity training, where self-directed diversity training modules are completed and progress is tracked. In a world that seems to be shoving back on the perception of "forced diversity," it makes sense that individual direction would be more widely accepted. Giving individuals a deadline in which they must complete the training, but then leaving the progression and experience entirely to the individual creates a personal experience they'll remember. Also, utilizing technology in this manner enables efficient delivery across the entire workplace, both virtual and physical. The future is rapidly approaching, and with an ever-diversifying world of work buoyed by rapid technological advancement, HR and the companies we support are most certainly heading toward a greater need for inclusion than any time in history. I stand ready to help you create the workplace that exceeds the expectations of current and future workforces. Photo: Twenty20

Talent Is a #1 Priority: 8 Best Practices for Employee Engagement

Publicación de blog

Talent Is a #1 Priority: 8 Best Practices for Employee Engagement

Employees are the center of the conversation at companies, because they're ultimately the energy, muscle and brains behind what the company produces. More and more companies are realizing the value of their top talent and in return are rewarding them for their hard work with gourmet food, on-site massages and unlimited vacations. While those perks are nice-to-haves, what employees really want is a company culture where they have the opportunity for growth and feel a sense of community. Despite efforts to please and pamper employees, 70 percent of employees feel disengaged at work, according to a Gallup poll. An active effort to improve the employee experience relies on reducing the number of disengaged employees. How? Here are eight tips to start: Take interest in employees' values and personal lives Empower employees to think outside the box Let employees take the lead on projects Talk about big wins as a way to congratulate the tea Provide learning and training opportunities Collect feedback about what employees value Make volunteering a priority Create a culture of constructive criticism and feedback Want to learn more about these strategies? View the SlideShare below. Talent is Here to Stay: Best Practices for Employee Engagement from Cornerstone OnDemand

3 Ways to Engage the Next Generation of RNs

Publicación de blog

3 Ways to Engage the Next Generation of RNs

Katrina Greer applied to college planning to become an orthodontist. But after her father was diagnosed with leukemia during her senior year of high school, her aspirations of working in healthcare shifted. "I remember the nurses coming in and taking care of him, while he would shake and wasn't able to do things himself," says Katrina, "Nurses saved my dad." Katrina is now a Registered Nurse at Penn State Hershey Medical Center, where her father was treated. But while she entered the job with a keen, personal understanding of quality patient care from watching her fathers' nurses, and with technical skills from years of school, her education is far from over. "There's new things that come out every single day that you have to adjust to," says Katrina. The technical and medical knowledge required of nurses today far exceeds the expectations of previous decades, and in addition to more complex job requirements, the talent pipeline for nursing is thin. Preparing RNs for a Future of Quality Care As experienced nurses retire and healthcare reform expands coverage, the need for nurses is exceeding the supply. A recent study from Georgetown University predicts the economy will create 1.6 million job openings for nurses by 2020—but schools are struggling to meet growing demand, leading to an estimated shortfall of nearly 200,000 nursing professionals. With a talent shortage and an increasingly young workforce, it's critical for hospitals to provide access to education and training for nurses. Continued education not only helps nurses make more informed decisions, it also increases employee engagement—leading to better patient care overall. According to a recent Gallup report, higher nurse engagement scores lead to lower patient mortality and complications. Below are three learning strategies to engage the next generation of nurses and ensure a future of quality care: 1. Provide 24/7 Access to Training As Katrina shared, RNs must constantly adapt to new patient situations, treatment options and industry regulations. Access to reference materials and live sessions provides nurses with the knowledge they need to provide the best care for their patients. In addition, the American Society for Healthcare and Human Resources Administration found that employees who have access to "meaningful learning and development opportunities" are typically highly engaged. 2. Offer Real-Time Evaluation Annual reviews and one-off feedback sessions often fail to make a substantial difference in employee performance. Instead, offer proactive feedback to help nurses improve on the floor. Cornerstone's Observation Checklist software is one way to evaluate performance in real-time—with customizable rating methods based on your organization's goals and online access to reporting features. Not only does real-time feedback help nurses consistently improve, but studies show that strong development programs also lead to a 27 percent lower employee turnover. 3. Align Individual Goals with Organization's Mission Nursing is far more than giving shots and assessing patients. As Angela Perlakowski, an RN at Penn Hershey, shares, "The best nurses are ones who can balance compassion and critical thinking." People typically pursue a career in healthcare because they want to help people—but the multitude of small tasks and important details can be distracting from this larger goal. By aligning each nurse's goals with the mission of the hospital, you can help employees learn to complete tasks while truly caring for the patient. In the end, this will lead to stronger employee loyalty, better performance and higher patient satisfaction. Photo: Shutterstock

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