Infográfico

How to keep your employees from jumping ship

Your business needs to LEAP

Susan Jeffery

Senior Content Marketing Manager

Learning. Empathy. Advancement. Purpose (LEAP). The key to retaining employees, especially in times of low unemployment, lies in building a company culture based on these four words. Low unemployment means that employees are in the driver's seat, choosing the jobs they want and jumping ship for better opportunities when they come along. Job openings are plentiful and employees have a lot of choice in front of them.

It's a great situation for employees, but what does it mean for businesses? Retaining your top talent has become more difficult and more important than ever. Filling a vacant role by an employee who jumps ship can cost up to 150x that employee' annual salary to find, onboard, and get new talent up to speed.

To hold onto your employees, your business needs to LEAP. Take a look at our infographic to get a breakdown on how to get started.

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