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In the last 25 years, a new world of work has emerged. Between just three generations—Baby Boomers, Gen X and Millennials—there's been a tech revolution, the rise of the gig economy, a growing automation of jobs and increased globalization, just to name a few of the major changes that have rocked the workforce.

While most of these changes have contributed to a more efficient, flexible and productive workplace, they have also created a generation gap. According to research by ASTD Workforce Development Community, "more than 1 in 3 people waste five or more hours each week, due to chronic, unaddressed conflict between colleagues from different generations."

Companies have recognized the problem and many are working to tackle the widening generation gap head-on by instituting mentorship programs, promoting cross-generational teamwork and adjusting compensation and benefit plans. But one solution to easing generational differences takes advantage of a cross-generational relationship nearly all of us have experienced: parent and child.

Remember bring your kids to work day? Well, an increasing number of companies—including Cornerstone—have launched their own "Bring Your Parents to Work Day," enabling Millennials to spend a day showing their parents exactly what the modern day workplace is all about. When parents see the Cornerstone office and experience firsthand where their child spends their days, they not only feel a sense of pride but also express an interest in working there.

But the day doesn't just give parents a window into their son or daughter's work life—it also provides an opportunity for current employees to get valuable career advice from the people they trust most: their parents.

Here's what employees at Cornerstone and elsewhere have to say about their parents' advice.

"The best piece of career advice my dad has ever given me is to always do the right thing. If you can go to sleep at night knowing you did the right thing all day, then you are doing a job well done."

— Jenny Savage, Senior Social Media Specialist at Cornerstone OnDemand

"The best piece of career advice my parents ever gave me was to never think myself above any task. Whether it be in an internship or a job, showing your willingness to work and excel in any task can help you move forward and impress much more than having an attitude that you're better than the work you are being asked to do."

— Maya Merlis, PR Coordinator at Amplify Relations.

"Enjoy what you do but also have the balance in your life so that you can enjoy who you are with."

— Neal Duggleby, Talent Operations Partner at Cornerstone OnDemand

"My father always told me, 'Do what you love and the money will follow.' It has been a great source of hope when the money was tight—and still occasionally is—and a wonderful reminder that happiness can persist through your personal and professional life, in a sort of harmony."

— Nathaniel Bellon, Professional Musician at The Empty Pockets

"You decide how much fun your job is and you decide if it's a daily grind or a game you get to play every day."

— Dave Kozisek, Product Manager at Cornerstone OnDemand

"My mom always encouraged me to ask for what I wanted and would often say, 'The worst thing they can do is say 'no.'' She taught me to be courageous."

— Monica Mendoza, Executive Director at Jolkona

Photo: Cornerstone OnDemand