Close

Sign up to get the latest news and stories on the future of work.

Subscribe Search

Search form

Editor's Note: This post is part of our "Cartoon Coffee Break" series. While we take talent management seriously, we also know it's important to have a good laugh. Check back regularly for a new ReWork cartoon.

In the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, employers started adding new benefits to protect their employees’ health and well-being during the difficult time. Not only did employers enhance their overall healthcare benefits, but many also announced plans to make changes to paid time off or vacation programs.

But today, even as the newness and novelty of employees' remote work lifestyles is starting to wear off, employers’ commitment to workforce wellness is not. In fact, improved corporate wellness programs have been a silver lining to this pandemic: Employers are now creating more holistic programs that focus on employees’ emotional, physical, social, and environmental well-being. 

Encouraging exercise, for example, has become a key element of employee wellness programs because of the positive effects it can have on a person’s physical and mental health. To help employees get moving, some companies are offering free yoga sessions and workout app subscriptions. The social media company Pinterest has even started hosting weekly virtual dance classes targeted toward working parents and their children to help these especially busy employees get moving. 

In the post-COVID workplace, corporate wellness programs will continue to play an important role in improving employees’ well-being and productivity. It’s a good idea for companies to start preparing for this future reality now by making sure that they have the budgets and plans to maintain some of the remote work-inspired initiatives that employees enjoyed during the initial months of the pandemic. 

For more advice on how to protect employees’ health and well-being during and after this crisis, check out this recap from Whitney Johnson about her conversation with Hubert Joly, the former CEO of Best Buy, and his purpose-driven, people-first approach to business.