Blog Post

3 Skills Every Employee Needs in 2020 (And Beyond)

Jeff Miller

Chief Learning Officer and Vice President of Organizational Effectiveness, Cornerstone OnDemand

The rise of technology in the workplace has many employees looking to adopt new skills in order to keep pace, like coding or data analytics. But these skills will likely have a short shelf life. Artificial intelligence has already been trained to code, meaning even a developer’s job isn’t safe from future disruption.

Meanwhile our soft skills, such as empathy and communication, urgently need our attention. That’s because even though technology aims to drive efficiency, save time, increase productivity, it’s stressing us out. And under stress, it’s difficult to practice skills like empathy. Instead of understanding that some people take longer than others to adapt to change, for example, managers might lash out at an employee who is falling behind. The employee, in turn, might feel more resistant to a change initiative because of the stress they’re already experiencing in the workplace.

But as technology continues to upend the way we work, these soft skills—specifically: adaptability, delivering feedback and empathy—will ensure that employees can continue to work together and problem-solve. By developing a regular practice for each, managers and employees can better navigate today’s workplace disruptors like the rise of the gig economy or the increase in mergers and acquisitions. These skills help employees stand apart from passing trends and ongoing change and give them staying power.

Change Is Constant—So Become Adaptable

Even though change is a normal part of life, people tend to be bad at it. Part of the reason is described in Ann Salerno’s change cycle, which shows that we all experience feelings of fear and loss when we’re first confronted with change. Think about the announcement of a merger acquisition, for example: With it, employees feel the loss of the status quo, the fear of possible layoffs, uncertainty about new team members or technology. In fact, most M&As fail—and it’s often due to a lack of preparation and adaptability for such a change.

But change is the new normal in our digital age. To see success with disruptors like M&As, we need to practice adaptiveness, starting with the acceptance of those feelings of loss, fear and doubt. Know that these are temporary and work to take actionable steps towards a new normal, where everyone will reap the benefits of the change. The goal is to move more quickly from those early stages to more productive experiences with change, which will come with practice. Any time your company experiences a change, big or small, acknowledge and discuss it. Meet regularly with teams to discuss ongoing change initiatives. By keeping employees aware of what’s ahead, they can prepare for it—and even get good at transformation.

Delivering Feedback is No Longer the Manager’s Job—It’s Everyone’s

As how and where we work changes, so too do office dynamics. Across industries, titles have dissipated and there is less top-down command. More people are working remotely. And more offices are hiring contract or gig workers with specialized skills for short-term projects. As a result, typical chains of feedback are no longer effective; instead every employee needs to be able to accept feedback from every angle and know when to deliver it, too.

As a manager to many, I’ve gathered techniques for delivering feedback well that can be applied at all levels: First, take the time to get to know colleagues and their strengths, weaknesses and motivators. This will help build a rapport and make feedback feel fair and actionable. Then, goal-set. This step is crucial: By establishing specific expectations at the outset, it’s easier to determine whether or not critical feedback is necessary—if someone did not meet expectations, have a conversation.

Empathy—The Best Way to Handle Any Kind of Change

Empathy is the ability to examine a situation from another’s perspective to better understand their reaction or struggle. And in our ever-changing workplaces it’s more than just a soft skill — it’s a superpower. In fact, one study found 92% of employees believe empathy is undervalued in their workplace. Empathy allows employees to approach each other with kindness and understanding first, and set aside the stress or frustration they might be experiencing in this new world of work. By practicing empathy, managers and employees alike can make space for everyone to process changes, for example. This means not emoting frustration — through body language, words or tone of voice — when some are slow to adapt.

To exercise more empathy, begin by checking in with yourself. Create a weekly calendar appointment and take time to think about where you practiced empathy in or outside of the office. Did you enter a fit of rage when someone cut you off in traffic? Did you lash out at a remote co-worker who was unreachable when you needed them? Sit and think about where you did and didn’t practice empathy, observe your triggers and think up ways to change your immediate responses.

Adding technological innovation in the workplace is no longer predicted—it’s expected, and employees will have to continue adjusting to its resulting changes. But amid all this variability, there is one constant solution: honing in on our innately human capabilities. The fact of the matter is AI and robots can’t practice empathy, resilience or thoughtful communication in the same way humans can. This difference will set employees apart, and even become a point of emphasis, as disruption accelerates in the coming decade.

Related Resources

Want to keep learning? Explore our products, customer stories, and the latest industry insights.

How HR can win in the Skills Economy: Ageas case study

Video

How HR can win in the Skills Economy: Ageas case study

In this 30-minute session, Cindy Canoot, HR Manager and PMO for HR Technology, Processes and Analytics at Ageas will share with you some best practices and ideas to thrive in the skills economy.

The Impact of The Skills Economy on Organisations Today

Video

The Impact of The Skills Economy on Organisations Today

Spotlight on Electrolux and Ageas: Preparing for and maintaining impactful learning programs

Customer Story

Spotlight on Electrolux and Ageas: Preparing for and maintaining impactful learning programs

Driving business outcomes from an investment in learning content requires an engagement strategy that makes learning materials available and accessible to employees. Organisations need to launch and maintain learning programmes effectively to ensure they have maximum impact on both employees and the business as a whole. Both Ageas and Electrolux have successfully launched digital learning programmes, each taking steps to maintain and sustain engagement. How did Electrolux prepare to launch its learning campaign? Electrolux manages organizational learning and knowledge management with formal learning networks, Internet-based knowledge, as well as a company-own education facility. Learner engagement is one of the most important aspects for Electrolux to continuously develop talents. Therefore, Electrolux offers a plan for a learner engagement campaign that includes four main steps. 1. Knowing your audience Electrolux conducted interviews with employees to ensure the company’s learning and development strategy would meet their needs. In doing so, the company was able to connect learning content with the right audience. 2. Connecting it to your brand Electrolux believes using familiar, consistent branding helps make learning more memorable to create a long-term impact on its employees' behaviours. 3. Make it relevant and engaging Based on external and internal insights, Electrolux discovered that more frequent quarterly learner programmes cultivated higher levels of employee engagement than one large campaign launch. Employees were also awarded badges for each completed course, with leader boards to gamify the learning experience and motivate employees to participate. 4. Track performance for key insights Electrolux tracked and used metrics from the programme to gain deeper insights about its course completion rates. Using a previous campaign as a benchmark, Electrolux found that the success of their new learning strategy exceeded expectations. How did Ageas build an impactful learning content strategy? Ageas launched its digital learning platform two years ago but has always been conscious not to overwhelm employees with its vast library of learning material available. Ageas adopted a three-pillar strategy to reduce unnecessary noise and guide its people to the right learning content to spur their growth and development. 1. Generate one voice Key messages were planned each month from business, wellbeing and learning perspectives. These key messages were conveyed through links and content shared on Ageas’s digital platform to ensure messaging was aligned and consistent. 2. Make it relevant Ageas created its own competency framework to guide learners and help connect them with the most relevant learning materials. One such framework is “Technical Heroes”, which consists of nine core competencies that employees see right away on the landing page, each with links to relevant materials. By specifying the key areas of development and making learning material easy to access and navigate, learners are able to focus on what is most relevant to them. 3. Weave learning content into the digital onboarding journey Ageas has integrated its remote onboarding processes into the digital learning platform. Leveraging a combination of suggested learning materials (specific to the job or function of the employee) and live induction sessions has enabled a smoother, more consistent onboarding process. The impact of a successful learning strategy Investing in the best learning materials is only half of the equation. If learners are not interacting and engaging with the materials, the investment is not accomplishing its purpose. Learning must be at the core of every business decision, and leaders must inspire employees to take charge of their own development journeys. With a collective growth mindset throughout the business, the opportunities for innovation are vast.

Schedule a personalised 1:1

Talk to a Cornerstone expert about how we can help with your organisation’s unique people management needs.

© Cornerstone 2022
Legal