Blogbeitrag

5 Management Lessons You Won’t Learn Online

Steve Boese

Co-Chair, HR Technology Conference

A version of this post originally appeared on Fistful of Talent.

For HR professionals interested in improving our organizations and our abilities to find, attract, recruit, develop and retain great talent, there is no shortage of freely available resources: HR/Talent blogs, HR and workplace podcasts, webinars, LinkedIn Groups, Twitter chats, white papers — the list goes on and on. But while many of these resources offer great insight, advice, tips and tools, it's hard to sort out the truly valuable from the obvious.

Sometimes, I think we spend too much time searching for answers instead of paying attention to our own experiences and the people we have encountered along the way. The truth is, anyone can learn much of what they need to know about becoming a better manager by reflecting on their own careers.

Here are the top 5 lessons I've learned throughout my life about good management – from real, live, actual managers:

1) Trust: Age Sometimes is Just a Number

My first job was working retail at the mall with my high school buddy. We were about 17 — and due to a combination of decent upbringings and a low bar to climb over, were the most trustworthy employees out of a shaky lot. Once the store manager determined we were reliable, she slowly began to give us more and more responsibilities at the store.

We went from stockroom to customer service at the front of the store to inventory management and ordering, and eventually even to scheduling and payroll. It didn’t matter to her that we were just high school kids, or that we had not worked there (or anywhere) for very long. She let performance determine trust — and from there came more responsibility and opportunity.

2) Calm: Don't Cry Over Spilled OJ

A few years later, I had a summer job at a massive grocery distribution center. One evening, a forklift driver was attempting to move several large pallets of orange juice from an extremely high shelf when — suddenly — crash! The pallets gave way and, in an instant, there were hundreds of gallons of orange juice everywhere and the forklift driver was stunned on the ground, knocked out of his seat from the force of the impact.

Of course, my fellow employees and I began to freak out – no one knew what to do first. Then the shift manager arrived, and almost like a movie (if movies were made about night-shift warehouse workers), issued a series of calm directions: deal with the injured man first, then address the potential danger of additional pallets crashing, focus on clean-up third, and finally get everyone not needed at the scene back to work. Everyone played off his controlled attitude and within minutes, order was restored.

3) Perspective: Take One Step at a Time

My first "real" job after graduating was in a staff accounting and finance group for a huge corporation – The kind of place full of smart and nice people, but also the kind of place where a dense and determined bureaucracy had developed over many years. Young and arrogant, I was full of ideas about how we should change everything.

My manager humored me, while making sure I understood some important (and not covered in the official onboarding process) elements of the culture. He taught me the value of seeing the bigger picture, thinking about the one or two areas to try and effect change and then driving hard in these areas. The company was a massive ship – no 22 year-old was going to step in and turn it around! But a 22 year-old could have an impact if he played it smart, and my manager taught me that crucial lesson.

4) Respect: You Don't Know It All

The one thing that I found most important the first time I had to manage another person was patience. It can be really tempting to hit your first managerial role with the mindset of, "I know it all, and if the team just does ’it’ the way I would, we'll all be fine."

Trying to tell folks not only what to do, but how to do it, is the fastest path toward tension, disengagement and even rebellion. I learned this when a long-time (and very good) employee I was managing pulled me aside. In no uncertain terms, he informed me that the team did, in fact, know what they were doing, and that I, in fact, had about 20 fewer years of experience on the subject matter than they did.

5) Compassion: Your People Are People First

We have all encountered personal problems – from an illness or a death in the family, to problems with kids’ or parents' care-taking, to a bad breakup.

In two different situations, the "best" managers I ever had stood up as caring, decent and compassionate people. They never brought up things like "bereavement leave" or asked about where a particular piece of work stood. They demonstrated the kind of concern and empathy you’d want from someone who cares about your welfare. And in both cases, once the "crises" were over, I knew I would do just about anything to help both of them going forward.

What examples of great managers do you have from your career?

Photo: Shutterstock

Related Resources

Want to keep learning? Explore our products, customer stories, and the latest industry insights.

Wann sind Arbeitsbedingungen wirklich flexibel?

Blogbeitrag

Wann sind Arbeitsbedingungen wirklich flexibel?

Nicht erst seit der Corona-Pandemie in den Jahren 2020 bis 2022 stellt sich für viele Unternehmen die Frage nach der Flexibilisierung von Arbeitsort und Arbeitszeit. Aber gerade jetzt stehen Unternehmen vor der besonderen Herausforderung, wie sie mit dem Thema Homeoffice umgehen wollen. Es scheint eine große Unsicherheit in dieser Frage zu geben. Man rätselt, wie Mitarbeiterinnen und Mitarbeiter zurück ins Büro geholt werden können und ob dies überhaupt als sinnvoll erscheint. Hier gehen die Meinungen weit auseinander. Nun stelle man sich in einem kleinem Gedankenexperiment folgende Situation vor. Ein Unternehmen entschließt sich dazu, die Frage nach der Flexibilität von Arbeitszeit und Arbeitsort den Teams zu überlassen: „Ihr entscheidet selbst, wie Ihr die Dinge handhaben wollt und was für Euch als sinnvoll erscheint. Findet eine Regel für Euch und handelt danach. Wir erwarten nur, dass Ihr Euch irgendwie einigt“. Ein Team folgt dem Aufruf, stimmt sich ab. Unterschiedliche Aspekte werden in Erwägung gezogen und man kommt nach einer intensiven Debatte zu der gemeinsamen Einigung, dass alle Mitglieder des Teams jeden Tag von 9 bis 16 Uhr im Office erscheinen. Würden wir in diesem Fall von flexiblen Arbeitsbedingungen sprechen? Die Antwort lautet: Ja. Schließlich konnten die Mitglieder des Teams frei und flexibel entscheiden, wie sie es haben wollen. Die Antwort lautet aber zugleich: Nein. Offensichtlich haben hat sich das Team für feste Arbeitszeiten im Office entschieden. Was jetzt? Haben wir es hier mit einem Paradox zu tun? Die Lösung dieses logischen Problems liegt in der Unterscheidung zweier Arten von Regeln. Es gibt die Regel erster Ordnung. Sie beschreibt, wie die Dinge tatsächlich geregelt sind. Im hier beschriebenen Fall sind die Arbeitszeiten ganz offensichtlich fest geregelt. Die Mitarbeiterinnen und Mitarbeiter erscheinen jeden Tag von 9 bis 16 im Office. Dann gibt es die Regel zweiter Ordnung. Sie regelt, wer die Regeln wie aufstellt. In gewisser Weise ist dies eine Metaregel – eine Regel über den Umgang mit Regeln. Das klingt zugegebenermaßen etwas philosophisch, ist aber äußerst praktisch. Im hier beschriebenen Gedankenexperiment entscheiden die Mitarbeiterinnen und Mitarbeiter selbst über die Regeln. Es könnte auch die Geschäftsführung sein oder eine andere Autorität innerhalb des Unternehmens. Führt man diesen Gedanken fort, gelangt man zu vier, einfachen Konstellationen. Erstens, das Unternehmen entscheidet über die Arbeitsbedingungen und legt fest, dass die Mitarbeiter zu festen Zeiten an einem festen Ort sein müssen. Das ist die klassische, eher paternalistische Variante. Zweitens, das Unternehmen entscheidet über die Arbeitsbedingungen und räumt der Belegschaft ein hohes Maß an Selbstbestimmung ein – „Ihr könnt arbeiten wo und wann Ihr wollt“. Das wäre Arbeitsflexibilität nach Gutsherrenart. Die Mitarbeiter dürfen selbst bestimmten, weil es eine übergeordnete Autorität ihnen gnädig erlaubt. Drittens, die Mitarbeiter bestimmen selbst über die Flexibilität ihrer Arbeitsbedingungen und sie entscheiden sich für feste Arbeitszeiten und feste Arbeitsorte. Dies ist der im obigen Gedankenexperiment beschriebene Fall, eine Art selbstbestimmte Fixiertheit. Viertens, die Mitarbeiter bestimmten selbst über die Flexibilität ihrer Arbeitsbedingungen und sie entscheiden sich für Selbstbestimmtheit. Verfolgt man die öffentliche Diskussion rund um das Thema Arbeitsflexibilität und Homeoffice, dann scheinen die ersten beiden Konstellationen implizit im Raum zu stehen. Reflexartig geht man davon aus, dass das Unternehmen, der Betriebsrat oder irgendeine andere Autorität über die Arbeitsbedingungen der Mitarbeiterinnen und Mitarbeiter entscheidet. Auf ihren Schultern ruht die Verantwortung. Was ergibt Sinn? Wie können wir (die Autorität) es den Mitarbeitern recht machen? Wie gehen wir mit der Vielfalt individueller Präferenzen um? Wo ist der gemeinsame Nenner? Auf diese Fragen gibt es allerdings keine Antwort, die für alle Betroffenen, einschließlich der Kunden und Lieferanten zufriedenstellend sein wird. Zu vielfältig sind die Rahmenbedingungen, die Aufgaben, Anforderungen, Lebenssituationen etc. Vermutlich kann man die Frage nach der richtigen und sinnvollen Flexibilisierung der Arbeit nicht für alle Mitarbeiter lösen, wenn man nur die Regel erster Ordnung in Betracht zieht. Entscheidend ist die Frage, wer, wie über die Regeln entscheidet, also die Regel zweiter Ordnung. Dies führt zu einer gänzlich anderen Diskussion und zu anderen Schlussfolgerung als das Problem, wie man Dinge am Ende für Alle gleichermaßen regeln soll. Einfach ist diese Diskussion nicht. Wollen wir es einfach den Mitarbeitern selbst überlassen oder braucht es eine Ansage „von oben“? Am Ende bedeutet echte Arbeitsflexibilität, die Arbeitsbedingungen den Teams zu überlassen, worauf immer sie sich einigen.

HR heute – Reicht der Obstkorb noch? Was müssen wir noch alles bieten?

On-Demand-Webinar

Video

HR heute – Reicht der Obstkorb noch? Was müssen wir noch alles bieten?

Im Zuge des an Dramatik zunehmenden Fachkräftemangels und befeuert durch die Erfahrungen während der Corona-Pandemie scheinen die Erwartungen der Mitarbeitenden an ihre Arbeitgeber drastisch zu steigen. Für Arbeitgeber stellt sich daher die brennende Frage, was sie bieten müssen, um Mitarbeitende zu gewinnen und zu halten. Wir stellen Ihnen zusamnmen mit Prof. Dr. Armin Trost einen strategischen Rahmen vor, Ihnen hilft, sich im Wettrüsten um attraktive Arbeitsbedingungen zu positionieren: •Was bedeutet es, ein attraktiver Arbeitgeber zu sein und wie sehr kommt es auf einzelne Aspekte, wie Homeoffice, Weiterbildungsmöglichkeiten, Gehalt, Führung etc. an? •Was müssen Arbeitgeber bieten und was dürfen sie fordern? •Wie authentisch sollte das Arbeitgeberversprechen sein, vor allem dann, wenn die Arbeitsbedingungen weniger attraktiv sind? •Welche Rolle spielen Lernen, Entwicklung und die aktive Gestaltung der Arbeitswelt durch die Mitarbeitenden? •Was ist die Rolle von HR und des Fachbereichs? Wie können die Verantwortlichkeiten beider Seiten balanciert werden? Nutzen Sie die Möglichkeit, um Impulse zur Gestaltung der neuen Arbeitswelt zu erhalten

Übersicht über die Cornerstone Talent Management Suite

Video

Übersicht über die Cornerstone Talent Management Suite

In diesem Video bekommen Sie einen kurzen Überblick über die gesamte Cornerstone Talent Management-Lösung.

Vereinbaren Sie ein persönliches Gespräch

Sprechen Sie mit unseren Cornerstone-Expert:innen und erfahren Sie, wie wir Ihnen bei Ihren individuellen Anforderungen in puncto Personalmanagement helfen können.

© Cornerstone 2022
Impressum