Blogbeitrag

Why You Should Hire a Career Pivoter

Lynda Spiegel

Founder, Rising Star Resumes

Let's say you're hiring a senior HR manager at your company. What are the chances you would interview a candidate who had been teacher, a stay-at-home mom and a communications manager in financial services?

Pretty low? I thought so.

Recruiting firms, corporate HR departments and, today, even applicant tracking systems (ATS) gravitate toward job candidates whose careers have traveled a fairly straight trajectory. In HR, for instance, we expect candidates for mid-career roles to have started as an HR coordinator (or even an administrative assistant) before climbing the ladder to manager, director and vice president.

Why? Recruiters are conditioned to believe that knowledge increases in proportion to years of experience — but that's faulty reasoning, especially in our fast-changing world of work.

Rethinking the Definition of Value

A particular skill or years of practice isn’t what makes a candidate truly valuable; instead, it's his or her ability to learn new skills, methods or technologies that matters. Adopting a strategy that values intellect over line-by-line adherence to a job description will produce a better pool of viable candidates.

As the old adage goes, "You can teach an intelligent person, but you can't teach intelligence." Recruiters should adopt this mindset when evaluating job candidates, particularly those who have pivoted direction throughout their career.

Why do I say this with such conviction? The nature of work is undergoing unprecedented change, and the ways in which we accomplish certain tasks change with every advance in technology.

Job Hopping is the New Normal

As Charles Coy points out in "Why Job Hopping is the New Career Ladder," it's difficult, if not impossible, to predict the types of jobs that will be available even five years from now. In fact, the skills required for these jobs may not even have been invented yet. This uncertainty requires recruiters to focus on a variety of core skills; arguably, the most critical skill is the ability to learn.

That is precisely the skill that career pivoters have mastered through the variety of positions they've held. Whether employees pivot early or midway through their careers, adopting new skills develops new synapses in their brains, allowing them to learn even more.

For example, Noah majored in music at college and intended to teach, when he was recruited to run operations in his family's manufacturing business. Two years later, when my company needed CRM sales support, the hiring manager wanted me to hire a Salesforce ninja, and was shocked when I suggested Noah. "But he's never even used the app!" the manager protested. Pointing out that any college grad Noah's age had grown up using apps and would soon learn Salesforce, the manager agreed to meet Noah and was impressed by his interest in learning new things. Noah has since earned his Salesforce certification and is now running market research at a major publishing company.

A New Set of Core Skills

As HR professionals, we need to learn a new way to evaluate candidates — not only to prepare ourselves for how recruitment is changing, but also to develop a better understanding of career pivoters whose paths are marked by a variety of industries and professions.

So, what are those new "core skills" we should be looking for? With a predictive eye toward the future, here are my recommendations:

  • Social intelligence: In a global work environment, employees need to collaborate with far-flung groups of co-workers/clients, and demonstrate cultural sensitivity and openness to diversity.

  • Innovation: Candidates whose resumes showcase their creativity and willingness to propose new processes represent value for your company. This type of employee is interested in examining the paradigm and reconfiguring it — and that's a skill you need in a world where following the "traditional" way of doing things will leave you behind.

  • Technical literacy: Every profession requires knowledge of industry-relevant technology, but that doesn't mean recruiters should reject candidates who don't have specific software skills. Look for quality and quantity in the types of technological tools the candidate understands — an employee who learned one app can always learn another app.

  • Adaptability: A good indication of adaptability is one or more career pivots, either within a job function or an industry. Exposure to and success in a variety of industries and environments likely means a candidate works well with others and learns fast.

Let's return to the candidate for the HR position. The one who had been a teacher, a stay-at-home parent and manager of a communications team? That was me.

I didn't know about employment law, benefits or compensation analysis when I started, but those and other responsibilities of a HR generalist were acquired over time, through careful study and observation. They weren't the skills that landed me the job, or allowed me to excel. Rather, the variety of roles I had held demonstrated my adaptability, teaching in a multi-cultural environment developed my social intelligence and I had made it a point to stay ahead on technology.

So, recruiters: Next time you receive a career pivoter's resume, get excited — it could just be your next star employee.

Photo: Creative Commons

Related Resources

Want to keep learning? Explore our products, customer stories, and the latest industry insights.

Wann sind Arbeitsbedingungen wirklich flexibel?

Blogbeitrag

Wann sind Arbeitsbedingungen wirklich flexibel?

Nicht erst seit der Corona-Pandemie in den Jahren 2020 bis 2022 stellt sich für viele Unternehmen die Frage nach der Flexibilisierung von Arbeitsort und Arbeitszeit. Aber gerade jetzt stehen Unternehmen vor der besonderen Herausforderung, wie sie mit dem Thema Homeoffice umgehen wollen. Es scheint eine große Unsicherheit in dieser Frage zu geben. Man rätselt, wie Mitarbeiterinnen und Mitarbeiter zurück ins Büro geholt werden können und ob dies überhaupt als sinnvoll erscheint. Hier gehen die Meinungen weit auseinander. Nun stelle man sich in einem kleinem Gedankenexperiment folgende Situation vor. Ein Unternehmen entschließt sich dazu, die Frage nach der Flexibilität von Arbeitszeit und Arbeitsort den Teams zu überlassen: „Ihr entscheidet selbst, wie Ihr die Dinge handhaben wollt und was für Euch als sinnvoll erscheint. Findet eine Regel für Euch und handelt danach. Wir erwarten nur, dass Ihr Euch irgendwie einigt“. Ein Team folgt dem Aufruf, stimmt sich ab. Unterschiedliche Aspekte werden in Erwägung gezogen und man kommt nach einer intensiven Debatte zu der gemeinsamen Einigung, dass alle Mitglieder des Teams jeden Tag von 9 bis 16 Uhr im Office erscheinen. Würden wir in diesem Fall von flexiblen Arbeitsbedingungen sprechen? Die Antwort lautet: Ja. Schließlich konnten die Mitglieder des Teams frei und flexibel entscheiden, wie sie es haben wollen. Die Antwort lautet aber zugleich: Nein. Offensichtlich haben hat sich das Team für feste Arbeitszeiten im Office entschieden. Was jetzt? Haben wir es hier mit einem Paradox zu tun? Die Lösung dieses logischen Problems liegt in der Unterscheidung zweier Arten von Regeln. Es gibt die Regel erster Ordnung. Sie beschreibt, wie die Dinge tatsächlich geregelt sind. Im hier beschriebenen Fall sind die Arbeitszeiten ganz offensichtlich fest geregelt. Die Mitarbeiterinnen und Mitarbeiter erscheinen jeden Tag von 9 bis 16 im Office. Dann gibt es die Regel zweiter Ordnung. Sie regelt, wer die Regeln wie aufstellt. In gewisser Weise ist dies eine Metaregel – eine Regel über den Umgang mit Regeln. Das klingt zugegebenermaßen etwas philosophisch, ist aber äußerst praktisch. Im hier beschriebenen Gedankenexperiment entscheiden die Mitarbeiterinnen und Mitarbeiter selbst über die Regeln. Es könnte auch die Geschäftsführung sein oder eine andere Autorität innerhalb des Unternehmens. Führt man diesen Gedanken fort, gelangt man zu vier, einfachen Konstellationen. Erstens, das Unternehmen entscheidet über die Arbeitsbedingungen und legt fest, dass die Mitarbeiter zu festen Zeiten an einem festen Ort sein müssen. Das ist die klassische, eher paternalistische Variante. Zweitens, das Unternehmen entscheidet über die Arbeitsbedingungen und räumt der Belegschaft ein hohes Maß an Selbstbestimmung ein – „Ihr könnt arbeiten wo und wann Ihr wollt“. Das wäre Arbeitsflexibilität nach Gutsherrenart. Die Mitarbeiter dürfen selbst bestimmten, weil es eine übergeordnete Autorität ihnen gnädig erlaubt. Drittens, die Mitarbeiter bestimmen selbst über die Flexibilität ihrer Arbeitsbedingungen und sie entscheiden sich für feste Arbeitszeiten und feste Arbeitsorte. Dies ist der im obigen Gedankenexperiment beschriebene Fall, eine Art selbstbestimmte Fixiertheit. Viertens, die Mitarbeiter bestimmten selbst über die Flexibilität ihrer Arbeitsbedingungen und sie entscheiden sich für Selbstbestimmtheit. Verfolgt man die öffentliche Diskussion rund um das Thema Arbeitsflexibilität und Homeoffice, dann scheinen die ersten beiden Konstellationen implizit im Raum zu stehen. Reflexartig geht man davon aus, dass das Unternehmen, der Betriebsrat oder irgendeine andere Autorität über die Arbeitsbedingungen der Mitarbeiterinnen und Mitarbeiter entscheidet. Auf ihren Schultern ruht die Verantwortung. Was ergibt Sinn? Wie können wir (die Autorität) es den Mitarbeitern recht machen? Wie gehen wir mit der Vielfalt individueller Präferenzen um? Wo ist der gemeinsame Nenner? Auf diese Fragen gibt es allerdings keine Antwort, die für alle Betroffenen, einschließlich der Kunden und Lieferanten zufriedenstellend sein wird. Zu vielfältig sind die Rahmenbedingungen, die Aufgaben, Anforderungen, Lebenssituationen etc. Vermutlich kann man die Frage nach der richtigen und sinnvollen Flexibilisierung der Arbeit nicht für alle Mitarbeiter lösen, wenn man nur die Regel erster Ordnung in Betracht zieht. Entscheidend ist die Frage, wer, wie über die Regeln entscheidet, also die Regel zweiter Ordnung. Dies führt zu einer gänzlich anderen Diskussion und zu anderen Schlussfolgerung als das Problem, wie man Dinge am Ende für Alle gleichermaßen regeln soll. Einfach ist diese Diskussion nicht. Wollen wir es einfach den Mitarbeitern selbst überlassen oder braucht es eine Ansage „von oben“? Am Ende bedeutet echte Arbeitsflexibilität, die Arbeitsbedingungen den Teams zu überlassen, worauf immer sie sich einigen.

HR heute – Reicht der Obstkorb noch? Was müssen wir noch alles bieten?

On-Demand-Webinar

Video

HR heute – Reicht der Obstkorb noch? Was müssen wir noch alles bieten?

Im Zuge des an Dramatik zunehmenden Fachkräftemangels und befeuert durch die Erfahrungen während der Corona-Pandemie scheinen die Erwartungen der Mitarbeitenden an ihre Arbeitgeber drastisch zu steigen. Für Arbeitgeber stellt sich daher die brennende Frage, was sie bieten müssen, um Mitarbeitende zu gewinnen und zu halten. Wir stellen Ihnen zusamnmen mit Prof. Dr. Armin Trost einen strategischen Rahmen vor, Ihnen hilft, sich im Wettrüsten um attraktive Arbeitsbedingungen zu positionieren: •Was bedeutet es, ein attraktiver Arbeitgeber zu sein und wie sehr kommt es auf einzelne Aspekte, wie Homeoffice, Weiterbildungsmöglichkeiten, Gehalt, Führung etc. an? •Was müssen Arbeitgeber bieten und was dürfen sie fordern? •Wie authentisch sollte das Arbeitgeberversprechen sein, vor allem dann, wenn die Arbeitsbedingungen weniger attraktiv sind? •Welche Rolle spielen Lernen, Entwicklung und die aktive Gestaltung der Arbeitswelt durch die Mitarbeitenden? •Was ist die Rolle von HR und des Fachbereichs? Wie können die Verantwortlichkeiten beider Seiten balanciert werden? Nutzen Sie die Möglichkeit, um Impulse zur Gestaltung der neuen Arbeitswelt zu erhalten

Übersicht über die Cornerstone Talent Management Suite

Video

Übersicht über die Cornerstone Talent Management Suite

In diesem Video bekommen Sie einen kurzen Überblick über die gesamte Cornerstone Talent Management-Lösung.

Vereinbaren Sie ein persönliches Gespräch

Sprechen Sie mit unseren Cornerstone-Expert:innen und erfahren Sie, wie wir Ihnen bei Ihren individuellen Anforderungen in puncto Personalmanagement helfen können.

© Cornerstone 2022
Impressum