Blogbeitrag

Is Continuous Performance Management Here to Stay? Absolutely.

Joanne Holbrook

Principal Strategist, Cloud Solutions at Alight Solutions

About five years ago, I worked with a client who bristled at the idea of typical annual performance reviews. What they wanted to implement was a "conversation-based" performance review process. The process had to be employee driven; managers and employees held an ongoing, continuous dialogue about the employee’s performance throughout the year. At any point throughout the year, the employee’s colleagues or customers could also contribute performance input but the most important objective was that they didn’t want a performance rating. No rating. None. At all. And certainly not a numeric rating.

I had never heard of such a thing. I thought it was a radical, unstructured by design, way out of left field concept for measuring someone’s performance. Quite honestly, the whole premise felt like a flower-power, peace, love and happiness sort of approach to me. In my HR experience, I had only ever managed annual processes in which reviews were to be held at the end of the fiscal year and culminated in each employee receiving a score (maybe even a rank), that triggered the next major step in the process: performance improvement planning. Needless to say, I struggled to understand what was so wrong with annual reviews that this client wanted to throw it out wholesale.

Fast forward to today when the idea of continuous performance management is starting to take center stage. Many organizations, large and small, across a broad cross-section of industries, are adopting the philosophy. And there is a growing body of research that supports its necessity in today’s workplace. For instance, in 2015, 58 percent of HR leaders described their performance management process as an ineffective use of time. Let’s take a closer look at why.

There is no getting around it; today’s work landscape is vastly different from the days of traditional, annual performance management.

The way we work is different. Corralling employees in the office 40 hours a week, every week is a thing of the past. A recent survey found that 60 percent of companies offer employees telecommuting opportunities—a threefold increase in just 10 years.

The makeup of today’s workforce is unique. For the first time, there are four generations of workers in today’s workforce. Employers are challenged with meeting a wide spectrum of employee needs and expectations. There is no more "one size fits all" approach.

Technology continues to advance. Technology enables us to give and receive immediate feedback all the time. We rely on feedback from others for everything from which app to download to what to order for dinner.

Worker expectations have changed. Workers want meaning in their work, to be more empowered in their day to day decision making, and to be in the driver’s seat as they progress through their career. Top down decision making and rigid chains of command are outdated concepts. Workers want their managers to develop and guide them, not tell them what to do.

What does all this mean? Quite simply, it means traditional performance management thinking is outdated.

As I started researching continuous performance management, I came to understand it is not a new technology; it is a way of thinking. Successful companies weave performance into day-to-day thinking. While there is no secret sauce, I quickly found that there are a handful of key concepts that make up continuous performance management.

1) Continuous performance management means regular employee/manager check-ins.

Conversations about performance become an agenda item for ongoing manager/employee one-on-one meetings. Managers may offer observations or feedback from recent interactions or meetings. Employees may seek input for an upcoming task or activity. Goal progress may be discussed. Updates and outcomes from previous conversations are shared.

2) Continuous performance management incorporates input from others.

Given the nature of many virtual work environments, employees are encouraged to solicit feedback from others. Colleagues may also offer recognition for a job well done. With a continuous model, multiple voices contribute input to employees, often offering new perspectives for consideration. Taken in tandem with regular manager check-ins, the employee is now afforded an opportunity for ongoing self-reflection that is often lost in typical review processes.

3) Continuous performance management includes frequent data collection.

Rather than attempting to gather performance evidence once or twice a year, check-in data may be gathered as frequently as every two weeks. The data may also include input from others, outcomes from check-ins, or updates to goals or development plans. With fresh, current data in hand employees are empowered to take ownership of their development, potentially changing direction to perform better on the fly; giving more meaning to the employee’s work.

4) Continuous performance management captures periodic performance snapshots.

If you, like I, have ever been on the receiving end of feedback during an annual review about a growth opportunity that happened nine months ago, you can appreciate the value in capturing periodic benchmarks. Snapshots ensure that issues are addressed as they occur and provide a tangible way to demonstrate improvement. With employees driving the direction of their own development, mangers take on a supportive, coaching role with employees (vs. assessing and holding employees accountable) ultimately creating an environment that fosters trust and builds relationships.

Adopting a continuous model requires a cultural change, yes, but it does not necessarily have to mean abandoning traditional performance components like company goals, development plans, year-end reviews or ratings. In fact, because a continuous model assumes employees want to improve, companies may find the approach strengthens goal alignment, increases commitment to personal development plans, and makes for more meaningful reviews.

It may, however, require taking a look at the talent management system currently in place to ensure it will support continuous performance management. Recall the client who wanted to implement the "conversation-based" performance model I wrote of earlier? Well, my job was to guide their performance management system implementation to support it. Once I got over myself and got to work with the technology, I’m pleased to say that we did it. Using Cornerstone OnDemand, we built a development plan framework where employees tracked their conversations with their managers, we created a mechanism (via social collaboration) for employees to ask for and receive feedback from others within the organization and we devised a review process allowing managers to gather data to form a snapshot of the employee’s performance. With nary a single review rating in sight!

Related Resources

Want to keep learning? Explore our products, customer stories, and the latest industry insights.

Wann sind Arbeitsbedingungen wirklich flexibel?

Blogbeitrag

Wann sind Arbeitsbedingungen wirklich flexibel?

Nicht erst seit der Corona-Pandemie in den Jahren 2020 bis 2022 stellt sich für viele Unternehmen die Frage nach der Flexibilisierung von Arbeitsort und Arbeitszeit. Aber gerade jetzt stehen Unternehmen vor der besonderen Herausforderung, wie sie mit dem Thema Homeoffice umgehen wollen. Es scheint eine große Unsicherheit in dieser Frage zu geben. Man rätselt, wie Mitarbeiterinnen und Mitarbeiter zurück ins Büro geholt werden können und ob dies überhaupt als sinnvoll erscheint. Hier gehen die Meinungen weit auseinander. Nun stelle man sich in einem kleinem Gedankenexperiment folgende Situation vor. Ein Unternehmen entschließt sich dazu, die Frage nach der Flexibilität von Arbeitszeit und Arbeitsort den Teams zu überlassen: „Ihr entscheidet selbst, wie Ihr die Dinge handhaben wollt und was für Euch als sinnvoll erscheint. Findet eine Regel für Euch und handelt danach. Wir erwarten nur, dass Ihr Euch irgendwie einigt“. Ein Team folgt dem Aufruf, stimmt sich ab. Unterschiedliche Aspekte werden in Erwägung gezogen und man kommt nach einer intensiven Debatte zu der gemeinsamen Einigung, dass alle Mitglieder des Teams jeden Tag von 9 bis 16 Uhr im Office erscheinen. Würden wir in diesem Fall von flexiblen Arbeitsbedingungen sprechen? Die Antwort lautet: Ja. Schließlich konnten die Mitglieder des Teams frei und flexibel entscheiden, wie sie es haben wollen. Die Antwort lautet aber zugleich: Nein. Offensichtlich haben hat sich das Team für feste Arbeitszeiten im Office entschieden. Was jetzt? Haben wir es hier mit einem Paradox zu tun? Die Lösung dieses logischen Problems liegt in der Unterscheidung zweier Arten von Regeln. Es gibt die Regel erster Ordnung. Sie beschreibt, wie die Dinge tatsächlich geregelt sind. Im hier beschriebenen Fall sind die Arbeitszeiten ganz offensichtlich fest geregelt. Die Mitarbeiterinnen und Mitarbeiter erscheinen jeden Tag von 9 bis 16 im Office. Dann gibt es die Regel zweiter Ordnung. Sie regelt, wer die Regeln wie aufstellt. In gewisser Weise ist dies eine Metaregel – eine Regel über den Umgang mit Regeln. Das klingt zugegebenermaßen etwas philosophisch, ist aber äußerst praktisch. Im hier beschriebenen Gedankenexperiment entscheiden die Mitarbeiterinnen und Mitarbeiter selbst über die Regeln. Es könnte auch die Geschäftsführung sein oder eine andere Autorität innerhalb des Unternehmens. Führt man diesen Gedanken fort, gelangt man zu vier, einfachen Konstellationen. Erstens, das Unternehmen entscheidet über die Arbeitsbedingungen und legt fest, dass die Mitarbeiter zu festen Zeiten an einem festen Ort sein müssen. Das ist die klassische, eher paternalistische Variante. Zweitens, das Unternehmen entscheidet über die Arbeitsbedingungen und räumt der Belegschaft ein hohes Maß an Selbstbestimmung ein – „Ihr könnt arbeiten wo und wann Ihr wollt“. Das wäre Arbeitsflexibilität nach Gutsherrenart. Die Mitarbeiter dürfen selbst bestimmten, weil es eine übergeordnete Autorität ihnen gnädig erlaubt. Drittens, die Mitarbeiter bestimmen selbst über die Flexibilität ihrer Arbeitsbedingungen und sie entscheiden sich für feste Arbeitszeiten und feste Arbeitsorte. Dies ist der im obigen Gedankenexperiment beschriebene Fall, eine Art selbstbestimmte Fixiertheit. Viertens, die Mitarbeiter bestimmten selbst über die Flexibilität ihrer Arbeitsbedingungen und sie entscheiden sich für Selbstbestimmtheit. Verfolgt man die öffentliche Diskussion rund um das Thema Arbeitsflexibilität und Homeoffice, dann scheinen die ersten beiden Konstellationen implizit im Raum zu stehen. Reflexartig geht man davon aus, dass das Unternehmen, der Betriebsrat oder irgendeine andere Autorität über die Arbeitsbedingungen der Mitarbeiterinnen und Mitarbeiter entscheidet. Auf ihren Schultern ruht die Verantwortung. Was ergibt Sinn? Wie können wir (die Autorität) es den Mitarbeitern recht machen? Wie gehen wir mit der Vielfalt individueller Präferenzen um? Wo ist der gemeinsame Nenner? Auf diese Fragen gibt es allerdings keine Antwort, die für alle Betroffenen, einschließlich der Kunden und Lieferanten zufriedenstellend sein wird. Zu vielfältig sind die Rahmenbedingungen, die Aufgaben, Anforderungen, Lebenssituationen etc. Vermutlich kann man die Frage nach der richtigen und sinnvollen Flexibilisierung der Arbeit nicht für alle Mitarbeiter lösen, wenn man nur die Regel erster Ordnung in Betracht zieht. Entscheidend ist die Frage, wer, wie über die Regeln entscheidet, also die Regel zweiter Ordnung. Dies führt zu einer gänzlich anderen Diskussion und zu anderen Schlussfolgerung als das Problem, wie man Dinge am Ende für Alle gleichermaßen regeln soll. Einfach ist diese Diskussion nicht. Wollen wir es einfach den Mitarbeitern selbst überlassen oder braucht es eine Ansage „von oben“? Am Ende bedeutet echte Arbeitsflexibilität, die Arbeitsbedingungen den Teams zu überlassen, worauf immer sie sich einigen.

HR heute – Reicht der Obstkorb noch? Was müssen wir noch alles bieten?

On-Demand-Webinar

Video

HR heute – Reicht der Obstkorb noch? Was müssen wir noch alles bieten?

Im Zuge des an Dramatik zunehmenden Fachkräftemangels und befeuert durch die Erfahrungen während der Corona-Pandemie scheinen die Erwartungen der Mitarbeitenden an ihre Arbeitgeber drastisch zu steigen. Für Arbeitgeber stellt sich daher die brennende Frage, was sie bieten müssen, um Mitarbeitende zu gewinnen und zu halten. Wir stellen Ihnen zusamnmen mit Prof. Dr. Armin Trost einen strategischen Rahmen vor, Ihnen hilft, sich im Wettrüsten um attraktive Arbeitsbedingungen zu positionieren: •Was bedeutet es, ein attraktiver Arbeitgeber zu sein und wie sehr kommt es auf einzelne Aspekte, wie Homeoffice, Weiterbildungsmöglichkeiten, Gehalt, Führung etc. an? •Was müssen Arbeitgeber bieten und was dürfen sie fordern? •Wie authentisch sollte das Arbeitgeberversprechen sein, vor allem dann, wenn die Arbeitsbedingungen weniger attraktiv sind? •Welche Rolle spielen Lernen, Entwicklung und die aktive Gestaltung der Arbeitswelt durch die Mitarbeitenden? •Was ist die Rolle von HR und des Fachbereichs? Wie können die Verantwortlichkeiten beider Seiten balanciert werden? Nutzen Sie die Möglichkeit, um Impulse zur Gestaltung der neuen Arbeitswelt zu erhalten

Übersicht über die Cornerstone Talent Management Suite

Video

Übersicht über die Cornerstone Talent Management Suite

In diesem Video bekommen Sie einen kurzen Überblick über die gesamte Cornerstone Talent Management-Lösung.

Vereinbaren Sie ein persönliches Gespräch

Sprechen Sie mit unseren Cornerstone-Expert:innen und erfahren Sie, wie wir Ihnen bei Ihren individuellen Anforderungen in puncto Personalmanagement helfen können.

© Cornerstone 2022
Impressum