Témoignage de client

Commonwealth of Kentucky case study

The Commonwealth of Kentucky Drives Hiring, Development and Retention

From tourism, to transportation, to education and more, the Commonwealth
of Kentucky – Personnel Cabinet provides a diversity of services to communities across the state.

Why Cornerstone

As a public sector employer, Kentucky State Government is accustom to competing with the private sector for talent. However, with recordlow unemployment across the country on top of existing pay differences between public/private sector jobs, the vacant positions were piling up.

“We needed to find a way to attract talented people,” says Robbie Perkins, Director of IT for the Kentucky Personnel Cabinet, “And then we needed a way to develop and retain them.”

Cornerstone’s Recruiting and Learning Suites have proven successful in doing both. The Cornerstone implementation was fast—less than six months, the quickest of any enterprise system in Kentucky State Government to date—and affordable, actually saving IT budget and avoiding any additional appropriation of funds.

The results

Streamlined Internal Processes

Before the Kentucky State Government could attract new candidates with opportunities, it needed to streamline its internal systems and processes. The Kentucky State Government, which oversees HR functions, had disparate systems for recruitment and learning, and no electronic solution for onboarding, performance management, or succession. Leadership didn’t have visibility into talent analytics—keeping them from using data for workforce planning or improvements to their existing processes.

With Cornerstone, the Kentucky Personnel Cabinet consolidated its recruitment and training systems and implemented onboarding, performance management and succession planning thus providing a holistic solution for talent management. This allowed the team to operate more strategically. Cornerstone streamlined and automated HR processes to make day-to-day operations better for the HR team and managers and improved analytics and dashboard reporting to help them operate with data.

In addition to having these new “talent” tools at their fingertips, the Kentucky Personnel Cabinet also rebranded employment with Kentucky State Government under the moniker “Connecting People to Purpose.” “Purpose is what employees are looking for today, so we wanted to sell that –
we even branded our new Cornerstone Talent Suite MyPURPOSE”, states Robbie Perkins.

Driving Talent Learning and Longevity


In addition to implementing Cornerstone Learning, the team implemented Cornerstone’s CyberU, a subscription to a library of online courses, branded as “CommonwealthU” internally. Over 1,400
courses are available online, 24/7—a resource that existing employees can leverage for career development. Today, CommonwealthU has over 31,000 employee users and more than 187,000
online courses were completed in the first year.

Building a Culture of Learning and Growth


Kentucky State Government also implemented a team of internal advocates called Talent Management Champions to capture and share employee stories and experiences. Using interviews, the team creates Talent Engagement Videos to help develop and sustain a culture that embraces, enables and exemplifies the Commonwealth of Kentucky’s mission, vision and values. Moreover, the videos connect employees to each other throughout their career growth.


To date, these initiatives have been met with excitement and positive feedback from employees and stakeholders. And as the program builds momentum, the Commonwealth of Kentucky’s new branding begins to become a reality: “Come for a job. Stay for a career. Make a difference for a lifetime.”

Related Resources

Want to keep learning? Explore our products, customer stories, and the latest industry insights.

Contenus de formation : la clé de voûte de l’organisation apprenante

Webinaire à la demande

Contenus de formation : la clé de voûte de l’organisation apprenante

Comment construire une stratégie de contenus de formation efficace et optimisée dans votre entreprise ? La capacité d’apprendre conditionne plus que jamais la performance, voire la survie des organisations. Dans les « organisations apprenantes », où tous les collaborateurs sont animés du désir d’apprendre et de progresser, les contenus de formation sont la clé de voûte de la stratégie de formation. Largeur de l’offre, pertinence, diversité, accessibilité et individualisation des contenus… Sans ces attributs, les contenus rateront leur cible et raison d’être. Leader des solutions « Learning & Talent », Cornerstone mène aussi la course des contenus les plus pertinents. Quelles sont les thématiques les plus prisées des entreprises et des collaborateurs, en France et dans le monde ? Comment ont-elles évolué ? Comment s’est constituée la vaste bibliothèque proposée par Cornerstone ? Quels rôles pour les algorithmes, la curation sociale interne et l’intervention des curateurs ? Quelles leçons pour les Directions learning & development au moment d’élaborer leur stratégie de contenus ? Découvrez cet échange entre Yves Leheurteux (Senior Content Learning Consultant EMEA, Cornerstone) et Michel Diaz (Senior Industry Analyst, Féfaur) dans leur webinaire du 14 juin.

A Federal Survey Revealed the Top HCM Challenges—Here’s How to Overcome Them

Billet de blog

A Federal Survey Revealed the Top HCM Challenges—Here’s How to Overcome Them

Educe Group is a Cornerstone services partner with broad experience working with government agencies. HCMG and Cornerstone OnDemand recently teamed up to conduct a human capital management study and analyze responses gathered from more than 100 government HR executives on the federal, state, and local levels. The goal of the resulting research, the HCMG State of Human Capital Management in Government Report, was to benchmark the last five years of progress in HCM in the government space, identify trends and provide guidance for leaders going forward. We have paired some of the key findings with software-based tips and best practices to help you formulate a strategy to develop and engage your workforce. The most-cited barriers to change? Culture, in tandem with organizational structure and internal communications. The agency environment moves slower than the private sector, and this translates to fewer opportunities to roll out new initiatives. Creativity can be a key asset for getting around this challenge. Government organizations can handle this challenge by taking a phased approach to the rollout of a new system or initiative: List and prioritize all of your current and upcoming business requirements. Identify those that have both high business value and low barriers for change to get started start. Developa realistic timeline for implementing initial requirements, ensuring that you build in time for a comprehensive change management effort and training for administrators, managers and employees. Establish checkpoints throughout the process to validate plans with stakeholders at various levels of the organization to build accountability, engagement and adoption. Gradually roll out additional features in manageable increments, so that you can transform your business at a realistic pace while still engaging employees with new features. Bonus tip: Consider aligning your internal release schedule with that of your system vendor’s. This will provide consistency and create an expectation of enhancements with a predictable cadence. "You have to know who on the staff is actually interested in leadership. There is many a story of how a person was identified as ’high potential’ and given extra training, mentoring, etc., only [for employers to realize] that they had no interest in a higher-level position because they didn’t want the stress or wanted to spend more time with their family than a higher-level position would allow." Leverage your talent management software to bring your employees into the conversation and gain insight into their short and long-term aspirations, as well as their current engagement and satisfaction levels. Encourage your employees to complete an online profile describing their short-term and long-term career aspirations. This will serve as a conversation starter with managers about their career path options, and how to get there from their current position. Set hierarchical goals. Have managers sit down with their team members and map out long-term objectives that roll down to short-term goals. Again, this starts a conversation that may alert the manager early on of flight risks or potential career pivots. Make use of software-based engagement tools such as on-the-spot feedback and check-ins to facilitate continuous, transparent conversations between managers and employees. Display quick and easy happiness surveys on your system home page so that employees can report on how they're feeling about their job/work/boss/business at any given time and action can be taken in cases where feedback is trending negative. "Succession planning, especially in the federal sector, is a great challenge because of the concerns of pre-selections. You don’t want to build a succession plan with any particular person in mind because that gives the appearance that there is no room for competition for those roles." Development planning for potential successors must be intentional, tracked, multi-modal and aggressive in order to improve and encourage retention of high potential employees. Start by developing standard definitions of high-performing and high-potential employees, then calibrate those management ratings with senior management and HR. Mitigate bias and deepen the organization's leadership pipeline by identifying successors through talent searches based on specific criteria such as education, performance results, calibrated succession metrics and 360 competency ratings. Use tools like cohort leadership programs to build relationships, develop an idea-exchange program, facilitate moderated online leadership discussions with senior leaders and share interactive learning experiences. Involve leaders across talent acquisition, learning and development, rewards and human resources teams to create a holistic plan for high-performing, high-potential employees. This could be a part of broader efforts such as ensuring that job descriptions are aligned appropriately with skills and proficiency descriptors and instituting knowledge/skill increase through features such as observational checklists and regular peer feedback. The results shared in the HCMG State of Human Capital Management in Government Report show that there is awareness at the HR executive level of the need to remove cultural barriers in order to accelerate change, develop stronger programs to develop high potential employees and institute more effective succession planning. Developing more tactical plans to achieve these objectives will require breaking down each objective into manageable pieces to encourage adoption, engagement and acceptance along the way. Check out the infographic to view additional key findings! Photo: Creative Commons

Cornerstone Global Skills Report : développer les compétences dans le    « monde d’après »

Billet de blog

Cornerstone Global Skills Report : développer les compétences dans le « monde d’après »

La précédente édition du Cornerstone Global Skills Report a été réalisée quelques semaines après le début de la pandémie de Covid-19, dans un contexte très particulier. L’un des principaux enseignements de l’étude était le suivant : les collaborateurs sont beaucoup moins confiants dans la gestion des compétences de leur entreprise que les employeurs. C’est ce que nous avons nommé le « Skills Confidence Gap », c’est-à-dire le différentiel de confiance en matière de compétences. 18 mois plus tard, nous avons voulu savoir si ce différentiel s’était atténué ou au contraire agrandi. À l’automne 2021, nous avons donc conduit en partenariat avec Starr Conspiracy une nouvelle étude à l’échelle globale pour en savoir plus sur l’évolution des pratiques et stratégies de développement RH face aux transformations du monde du travail dans le « monde d’après ». Nous vous livrons dans ce billet les principaux résultats de cette enquête. Employeurs et collaborateurs : deux salles, deux ambiances La pénurie de talents ne date pas de la pandémie. Selon l’enquête Besoins de main-d’œuvre de Pôle Emploi, la part des recrutements considérés comme « difficiles » par les entreprises était déjà passée de 32% à 50% entre 2016 et 2019. Avant mars 2020, les employeurs se plaignaient déjà de ne pas trouver les compétences dont ils avaient besoin pour leurs entreprises. Mais dans l’esprit des collaborateurs, la question ne se posait pas du tout en ces termes : pour eux, les entreprises avaient déjà les talents qu’il leur fallait – à savoir, eux-mêmes. Le problème n’était pas la pénurie de talents, mais l’incapacité des employeurs à développer suffisamment les compétences des salariés. C’est ce qui ressortait clairement du Cornerstone Global Skills Report de 2020 : 9 employeurs sur 10 s’estimaient satisfaits de la façon dont leur entreprise assurait le développement des compétences. Chez les collaborateurs, on tombait à 6 sur 10. Soit un écart de 30 points de pourcentage. Malheureusement, cet écart ne s’est pas résorbé. En 2022, les collaborateurs ont encore moins confiance que deux ans plus tôt dans la capacité de leur entreprise d’être à la hauteur des enjeux de formation et de compétence : ils ne sont plus que 55% à émettre une opinion positive. Et entre-temps, la part des recrutements jugés difficiles est montée à 58%. Cette année, notre analyse s’étend à trois autres aspects majeurs de la perception des entreprises par leurs dirigeants et leurs salariés : L’effort d’investissement dans les compétences ; La contribution de la gestion des talents aux résultats de l’entreprise ; L’impact de la pandémie. Nous nous sommes également penchés sur la relation entre investissement dans les compétences et performance organisationnelle. C’est peut-être le résultat le plus instructif de cette édition 2022, comme nous le verrons plus loin. Quel est le secret des organisations performantes ? Insistons d’abord sur un point important, mis en lumière par notre étude : les entreprises comme leurs salariés s’accordent à considérer le développement des compétences comme un levier essentiel dans la construction de leur avenir commun. Selon le baromètre Centre Inffo 2022, les salariés français n’y font pas exception : 88% d’entre eux voient dans la formation professionnelle une chance d’évolution professionnelle. Tout le monde se retrouve sur la question. Ce qui différencie les organisations performantes des autres, ce n’est pas le fait d’investir dans les compétences, c’est la façon dont elles le font. Nous avons réparti les organisations en trois catégories : hautement performantes, moyennement performantes, peu performantes. Nous avons déterminé ces niveaux de performance en nous fondant sur 3 indicateurs : la rentabilité, le turnover et le Net Promoter Score® (NPS®), qui est un indicateur de satisfaction client considéré comme très efficace pour prédire la réussite commerciale d’une entreprise. Les organisations hautement performantes figurent parmi les plus rentables de leur secteur, présentent un bas niveau de turnover et bénéficient de résultats NPS élevés auprès de leurs salariés. Nous avons comparé les approches des trois catégories d’entreprises au regard du développement des compétences, de la stratégie de gestion des talents et de leur réaction à la pandémie. Les organisations les plus performantes affichent un écart de confiance dans la gestion des compétences (Skills Confidence Gap) nettement plus réduit entre employeurs et collaborateurs que les moins performantes. La différence s’établit en effet à 11 points (en défaveur des salariés) dans les entreprises hautement performantes contre 42 dans les moins performantes. Les entreprises de performance moyenne présentent un écart légèrement plus favorable que ces dernières, à 35 points. L’étude a également mis en évidence des différences significatives entre organisations hautement performantes et peu performantes dans bien d’autres domaines : formation des dirigeants, mobilité interne, engagement des salariés, rétention des talents, qualité du recrutement, diversité et inclusion. Manifestement, dans cette période d’incertitude, les entreprises les plus performantes ont misé sur l’investissement massif dans le capital humain et les compétences pour maintenir leur croissance, innover et réussir. Ces organisationsfondent leur succès sur le développement des compétences de leurs équipes ainsi que sur l’écoute des perceptions, des besoins et des attentes de leurs collaborateurs. Réduire l’écart Sans surprise, la pénurie de talent et les tensions de recrutement constituent le principal sujet d’inquiétude des employeurs pour les 3 années à venir. 48% d’entre eux en font l’une de leurs trois premières préoccupations. Beaucoup d’entreprises prennent la question très au sérieux et engagent ou planifient dès à présent des politiques de développement des compétences à la hauteur des enjeux. Mais toutes les entreprises ne le font pas dans les mêmes proportions : 72% des entreprises hautement performantes entendent prioriser le développement des compétences dans l’année qui vient, et 47% ont déjà commencé. Dans les entreprises de performance moyenne, on tombe à 34% d’entreprises qui prévoient des changements dans l’année qui et 33% dans les trois prochaines années. Les entreprises faiblement performantes sont 3 fois plus nombreuses à réduire l’investissement dans les compétences que les organisations les plus performantes. L’appétence pour la formation Où les salariés vont-ils chercher l’information sur leurs perspectives de carrière ? Si la première source demeure Internet (un résultat confirmé pour la France par le baromètre Centre Inffo), la plateforme interne de gestion des carrières et des compétences de l’entreprise vient immédiatement après. D’où l’importance d’avoir un LMS efficace et engageant pour stimuler l’envie de formation des collaborateurs, contribuant ainsi à nourrir une culture de l’apprenance et de la formation dans votre organisation. Les entreprises les plus performantes investissent également dans la diversification des outils de formation et de développement des compétences : formation en situation de travail, mentorat, coaching, formation formelle, cursus universitaires, formation à distance, digital learning… Cette diversité est la marque d’une vraie recherche d’adéquation avec les attentes et aux préférences des collaborateurs. Ce qui est certain, c’est que la formation et le développement des compétences figurent parmi les attentes fortes des collaborateurs. Il n’y a pas de recette toute faite pour mettre en place une stratégie de développement des compétences dans votre organisation. Pour rejoindre les rangs des entreprises hautement performantes, l’essentiel est d’écouter vos collaborateurs pour être en mesure de leur proposer toutes les opportunités de développement des compétences qu’ils souhaitent. C’est un investissement gagnant aussi bien pour les salariés que pour les employeurs. Si vous souhaitez en savoir plus sur les bonnes pratiques à mettre en place pour améliorer votre démarche de développement des compétences, n’hésitez pas à consulter le rapport complet

Planifiez un entretien personnalisé

Discutez avec un expert Cornerstone pour savoir comment nous pouvons répondre aux besoins spécifiques de votre organisation en matière de gestion du personnel.

© Cornerstone 2022
Mentions légales