Billet de blog

Learning Corner With Jeffrey Pfeffer: Why It’s Important to Include Age in Diversity and Inclusion Efforts

Jeffrey Pfeffer

Professor of Organizational Behavior, Stanford University

At Stanford University, during the 2018-2019 academic year, virtually every meeting of the faculty senate included a report—or two—on the university’s diversity efforts. Yet ageism was never addressed—and continues to go unnoticed. According to a faculty colleague, the former dean of the School of Engineering, who is now the Provost, appointed a strategy committee packed with young faculty members simply because, to use her highly inopportune phrase, "they are the future."

Clearly, diversity and inclusion are becoming a priority for all types of organizations. As of February 2018, diversity and inclusion roles, as a share of all job postings, were up by 35% from two years prior, according to Indeed. Meanwhile, PwC’s 18th Annual Global Survey noted that talent diversity and inclusiveness were now core components of competitiveness, and 77 percent of CEOs already had or intended to adopt a strategy that promotes D&I. Technology companies like eBay have even gone the extra step to regularly report their diversity statistics.

But, like with Stanford, virtually absent from most of these D&I conversations and action items is any mention of age. The arguments for valuing older employees are identical to the logic for emphasizing diversity and inclusion for other groups: In addition to being a matter of human rights (all people deserve equal opportunities and equal treatment), companies actually benefit from having a diverse workforce—and that includes diversity in age. After all, different perspectives often lead to more creative solutions and practices. Still, ageism in the workplace is a common and almost socially acceptable practice. It’s time for that to change.

Ageism Is Real

Ageism is a substantial workplace issue we need to address—especially because by 2022, more than one-third of the U.S. workforce will be over the age of 50.

In an AARP survey of adults over 45, 61% of respondents said that they had seen or personally experienced age discrimination. A review of academic studies of age bias in hiring and promotion concluded that "study after study has shown how employers... may not objectively evaluate job candidates’ potential productivity."

But it’s more than being passed over for career opportunities. A study by the Urban Institute found that of adults aged 51 to 54 who were employed full-time, some 56 percent subsequently experienced an employer-initiated involuntary job separation, with typically devastating financial consequences (not to mention psychological repercussions).

Much like racism and sexism, ageism not only harms its victims, but it also infects a company’s culture, creates a less inclusive workplace and deprives organizations of the talent they need to compete and innovate. And it’s why companies need to include age as they work on broader D&I initiatives.

Many Myths About Older Employees Are False

So what exactly is driving this discriminatory behavior? Stereotypes about older workers that are as pervasive—and harmful—as those about other demographic groups. But, as is often the case, these beliefs are inconsistent with the evidence.

Contrary to popular mythology, youth is not a key attribute for founding a successful business. One study found that the average age of entrepreneurs was 42. Even considering just the top 0.1% of startups based on revenue growth during the first five years, founders started their companies, on average, at age 45.

There’s also no evidence to suggest that age is related to productivity. Stephen Cole, a sociologist at SUNY Stony Brook, reported decades ago that mathematicians, who, it was assumed, did their best work while young, experienced "no decline in the quality of work... as they progressed through their careers." And another review of studies found that productivity was constant as scientists aged.

Such evidence suggests that companies can and do benefit from encouraging the hiring and retention of older workers, just as they can benefit from hiring and retaining women and people of color. In all of these instances, companies access a broader and better pool of talent.

Companies Should Expand Their D&I Efforts to Include Age

So how should we attack the problem? Fundamentally, research shows that measurement is important in influencing behavior. What gets measured gets managed. As companies increasingly report their D&I statistics for women, people of color and other groups, they should also report the data for the age distribution of their workforce.

There are other things companies can do as well. We know that language matters—that we see things, in part, by the way we refer to them—and that words can hurt. Many companies have banned racist, misogynist language and call out those who use terms that inflict psychological distress on others. A similar sensitivity to ageist language (even the use of more subtle terms like "energetic and fresh" or "digital natives" to describe a company’s ideal employees)—would be a nice step in the right direction. Stereotypes about older workers and disparaging comments about them remain too common, as numerous surveys attest.

When symphony orchestras wanted to hire more women, they did blind auditions where people could not see the gender of the person performing. When companies sought to build more inclusive workplaces, they focused on eliminating interview questions or signals that would not only harm someone’s chance of gaining employment, but also their likelihood of accepting an offer because the questions made them feel unwelcome. Consider taking dates off of resumes and banish questions that call into doubt someone’s energy or commitment just because of their age.

The parallels with other diversity and inclusion initiatives are many and direct. When companies do for age what they have already begun to do for race and gender, they will be well on their way to building a more diverse and welcoming workplace.

Until workplaces take ageism seriously, it will continue, depriving employers of wisdom, experience and talent, and inflicting unjust behavior on people simply because they have "too many birthdays."

Image: Creative Commons

Related Resources

Want to keep learning? Explore our products, customer stories, and the latest industry insights.

L'index d'égalité femmes - hommes 2020/2021

Billet de blog

L'index d'égalité femmes - hommes 2020/2021

Cornerstone s'engage à créer un lieu de travail diversifié, équitable et inclusif où chacun se sent considéré et valorisé. Depuis le 1er mars 2020, les entreprises françaises de moins de 250 salariés sont dans l’obligation de publier leur iindex d'égalité femmes- hommes. Au cours des deux dernières années, Cornerstone a réalisé des progrès dans ce domaine, obtenant 74 points sur un total de 100 en 2021, contre 67 points en 2020.  Voici un résumé des scores obtenus par Cornerstone France en 2021:  Écart de rémunération entre hommes et femmes: 23 points sur 40 (contre 17 points sur 40 en 2020). Écart de répartition des augmentations individuelles: 35 points sur 35 (identique en 2020: 35 points sur 35). Salariés bénéficiant d'augmentations au retour d'un congé maternité : non calculé en 2021 car il n'y a pas eu de congé maternité dans l'année (15 points sur 15 en 2020). Répartition des 10 plus hautes rémunérations : 5 points sur 10 (contre 0 point sur 10 en 2020). Nous avons certes progressé en matière d'égalité salariale entre les hommes et les femmes, mais nous restons déterminés dans notre engagement à progresser d'année en année et à apporter des améliorations afin de garantir un environnement de travail équitable. Fidèles à notre mission, toujours apprendre, - nous promettons à tous les Cornerstars de toujours continuer à viser l’excellence.  Pour 2022, nous nous concentrerons sur: Des augmentations de rémunération pour nous assurer de combler les écarts de rémunération entre femmes - hommes. Un processus de recrutement qui respecte notre politique mondiale et régionale de diversité et d'inclusion. La garantie de l'égalité des chances en matière de développement de carrière pour chaque Cornerstar, afin qu'ils continuent de bénéficier d’opportunités équitables de progression de carrière. Dans le cadre des valeurs fondamentales de Cornerstone, nous sommes fiers d'être un employeur offrant l'égalité des chances (EOE: Equity Opportunity Employer), tout comme nous sommes fiers de la diversité de nos Cornerstars qui viennent de différents horizons, se sentent valorisés pour leurs contributions et sont prêts à aller de l’avant ensemble. “Chez Cornerstone, nous nous engageons en matière de diversité, d'équité et d'inclusion au-delà du recrutement et nous veillons à ce que nos pratiques, nos programmes et nos conversations créent un lien d'appartenance. Notre vision: éduquer le monde, tout en encourageant les leaders à apporter des changements durables et significatifs qui impactent toutes nos communautés, employés et clients.” Corinne Bidallier, Directrice nationale, France Pour en savoir plus, veuillez consulter le site https://www.cornerstoneondemand.com/company/diversity

Cornerstone Global Skills Report : développer les compétences dans le    « monde d’après »

Billet de blog

Cornerstone Global Skills Report : développer les compétences dans le « monde d’après »

La précédente édition du Cornerstone Global Skills Report a été réalisée quelques semaines après le début de la pandémie de Covid-19, dans un contexte très particulier. L’un des principaux enseignements de l’étude était le suivant : les collaborateurs sont beaucoup moins confiants dans la gestion des compétences de leur entreprise que les employeurs. C’est ce que nous avons nommé le « Skills Confidence Gap », c’est-à-dire le différentiel de confiance en matière de compétences. 18 mois plus tard, nous avons voulu savoir si ce différentiel s’était atténué ou au contraire agrandi. À l’automne 2021, nous avons donc conduit en partenariat avec Starr Conspiracy une nouvelle étude à l’échelle globale pour en savoir plus sur l’évolution des pratiques et stratégies de développement RH face aux transformations du monde du travail dans le « monde d’après ». Nous vous livrons dans ce billet les principaux résultats de cette enquête. Employeurs et collaborateurs : deux salles, deux ambiances La pénurie de talents ne date pas de la pandémie. Selon l’enquête Besoins de main-d’œuvre de Pôle Emploi, la part des recrutements considérés comme « difficiles » par les entreprises était déjà passée de 32% à 50% entre 2016 et 2019. Avant mars 2020, les employeurs se plaignaient déjà de ne pas trouver les compétences dont ils avaient besoin pour leurs entreprises. Mais dans l’esprit des collaborateurs, la question ne se posait pas du tout en ces termes : pour eux, les entreprises avaient déjà les talents qu’il leur fallait – à savoir, eux-mêmes. Le problème n’était pas la pénurie de talents, mais l’incapacité des employeurs à développer suffisamment les compétences des salariés. C’est ce qui ressortait clairement du Cornerstone Global Skills Report de 2020 : 9 employeurs sur 10 s’estimaient satisfaits de la façon dont leur entreprise assurait le développement des compétences. Chez les collaborateurs, on tombait à 6 sur 10. Soit un écart de 30 points de pourcentage. Malheureusement, cet écart ne s’est pas résorbé. En 2022, les collaborateurs ont encore moins confiance que deux ans plus tôt dans la capacité de leur entreprise d’être à la hauteur des enjeux de formation et de compétence : ils ne sont plus que 55% à émettre une opinion positive. Et entre-temps, la part des recrutements jugés difficiles est montée à 58%. Cette année, notre analyse s’étend à trois autres aspects majeurs de la perception des entreprises par leurs dirigeants et leurs salariés : L’effort d’investissement dans les compétences ; La contribution de la gestion des talents aux résultats de l’entreprise ; L’impact de la pandémie. Nous nous sommes également penchés sur la relation entre investissement dans les compétences et performance organisationnelle. C’est peut-être le résultat le plus instructif de cette édition 2022, comme nous le verrons plus loin. Quel est le secret des organisations performantes ? Insistons d’abord sur un point important, mis en lumière par notre étude : les entreprises comme leurs salariés s’accordent à considérer le développement des compétences comme un levier essentiel dans la construction de leur avenir commun. Selon le baromètre Centre Inffo 2022, les salariés français n’y font pas exception : 88% d’entre eux voient dans la formation professionnelle une chance d’évolution professionnelle. Tout le monde se retrouve sur la question. Ce qui différencie les organisations performantes des autres, ce n’est pas le fait d’investir dans les compétences, c’est la façon dont elles le font. Nous avons réparti les organisations en trois catégories : hautement performantes, moyennement performantes, peu performantes. Nous avons déterminé ces niveaux de performance en nous fondant sur 3 indicateurs : la rentabilité, le turnover et le Net Promoter Score® (NPS®), qui est un indicateur de satisfaction client considéré comme très efficace pour prédire la réussite commerciale d’une entreprise. Les organisations hautement performantes figurent parmi les plus rentables de leur secteur, présentent un bas niveau de turnover et bénéficient de résultats NPS élevés auprès de leurs salariés. Nous avons comparé les approches des trois catégories d’entreprises au regard du développement des compétences, de la stratégie de gestion des talents et de leur réaction à la pandémie. Les organisations les plus performantes affichent un écart de confiance dans la gestion des compétences (Skills Confidence Gap) nettement plus réduit entre employeurs et collaborateurs que les moins performantes. La différence s’établit en effet à 11 points (en défaveur des salariés) dans les entreprises hautement performantes contre 42 dans les moins performantes. Les entreprises de performance moyenne présentent un écart légèrement plus favorable que ces dernières, à 35 points. L’étude a également mis en évidence des différences significatives entre organisations hautement performantes et peu performantes dans bien d’autres domaines : formation des dirigeants, mobilité interne, engagement des salariés, rétention des talents, qualité du recrutement, diversité et inclusion. Manifestement, dans cette période d’incertitude, les entreprises les plus performantes ont misé sur l’investissement massif dans le capital humain et les compétences pour maintenir leur croissance, innover et réussir. Ces organisationsfondent leur succès sur le développement des compétences de leurs équipes ainsi que sur l’écoute des perceptions, des besoins et des attentes de leurs collaborateurs. Réduire l’écart Sans surprise, la pénurie de talent et les tensions de recrutement constituent le principal sujet d’inquiétude des employeurs pour les 3 années à venir. 48% d’entre eux en font l’une de leurs trois premières préoccupations. Beaucoup d’entreprises prennent la question très au sérieux et engagent ou planifient dès à présent des politiques de développement des compétences à la hauteur des enjeux. Mais toutes les entreprises ne le font pas dans les mêmes proportions : 72% des entreprises hautement performantes entendent prioriser le développement des compétences dans l’année qui vient, et 47% ont déjà commencé. Dans les entreprises de performance moyenne, on tombe à 34% d’entreprises qui prévoient des changements dans l’année qui et 33% dans les trois prochaines années. Les entreprises faiblement performantes sont 3 fois plus nombreuses à réduire l’investissement dans les compétences que les organisations les plus performantes. L’appétence pour la formation Où les salariés vont-ils chercher l’information sur leurs perspectives de carrière ? Si la première source demeure Internet (un résultat confirmé pour la France par le baromètre Centre Inffo), la plateforme interne de gestion des carrières et des compétences de l’entreprise vient immédiatement après. D’où l’importance d’avoir un LMS efficace et engageant pour stimuler l’envie de formation des collaborateurs, contribuant ainsi à nourrir une culture de l’apprenance et de la formation dans votre organisation. Les entreprises les plus performantes investissent également dans la diversification des outils de formation et de développement des compétences : formation en situation de travail, mentorat, coaching, formation formelle, cursus universitaires, formation à distance, digital learning… Cette diversité est la marque d’une vraie recherche d’adéquation avec les attentes et aux préférences des collaborateurs. Ce qui est certain, c’est que la formation et le développement des compétences figurent parmi les attentes fortes des collaborateurs. Il n’y a pas de recette toute faite pour mettre en place une stratégie de développement des compétences dans votre organisation. Pour rejoindre les rangs des entreprises hautement performantes, l’essentiel est d’écouter vos collaborateurs pour être en mesure de leur proposer toutes les opportunités de développement des compétences qu’ils souhaitent. C’est un investissement gagnant aussi bien pour les salariés que pour les employeurs. Si vous souhaitez en savoir plus sur les bonnes pratiques à mettre en place pour améliorer votre démarche de développement des compétences, n’hésitez pas à consulter le rapport complet

De limportance de la culture dentreprise, notamment pour rebondir…

Billet de blog

De limportance de la culture dentreprise, notamment pour rebondir…

Établir une culture d’entreprise positive Mais comment les entreprises peuvent-elles créer une nouvelle culture d'entreprise positive et attirer à nouveau des clients et employés, ainsi que des candidats potentiels, pour assurer leur réussite ? Favorisez la transparence, sinon vous serez confronté à des problématiques de confiance. Chaque entreprise a ses secrets. Le fait que la composition du Coca-Cola ne soit pas disponible à chacun est parfaitement logique. La situation est différente, cependant, pour les abus et violations au travail. La transparence, surtout lorsqu’il s’agit de conformité, est essentielle pour éviter de tels dérapages. Et ceci vaut également aux processus liés au personnel. En tant qu’employé, si je suis évalué, je veux savoir sur quels critères et pourquoi. Encouragez l’ouverture : il est essentiel d’expliquer pourquoi une action est ou n’est pas éthique. Ceci réclame une culture d’entreprise ouverte, où les employés présentant des griefs ou des problèmes, peuvent les pointer sans conséquence négative sur leur propre carrière. Développez un système efficace de gestion de la conformité. Mais en premier lieu, une culture de la conformité doit être créée, afin que les critiques soient entendues. Des règles doivent également être mises au point pour pouvoir la mesurer. Il est également essentiel que la non-conformité ait des conséquences disciplinaires. Le changement doit être initié jusqu’à ce qu’il soit finalement ancré dans la culture d’entreprise. Des outils logiciels peuvent ici se révéler utiles, en aidant à identifier les risques de conformité à un stade précoce et à faire en sorte que les employés soient formés à cet égard. Formez vos équipes : la formation est une opportunité d’initier activement un changement de culture. Après tout, elle sert à clarifier les valeurs et règles d'une entreprise, et les rendre accessibles à tous les employés. Une compréhension de base de la stratégie de l’entreprise est essentielle, tout comme de la façon dont le travail et la collaboration sont liés. À cet égard, les systèmes d'apprentissage peuvent fournir aux décideurs un soutien décisif, car ils créent la transparence nécessaire et touchent l’ensemble des employés – depuis le directeur jusqu’aux opérateurs de production. Geoffroy De Lestrange

Planifiez un entretien personnalisé

Discutez avec un expert Cornerstone pour savoir comment nous pouvons répondre aux besoins spécifiques de votre organisation en matière de gestion du personnel.

© Cornerstone 2022
Mentions légales