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Design a performance management process that is as unique as your organization

Performance Reviews
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Real-life 
success stories from Cornerstone customers

Real-life 
success stories from Cornerstone customers

“ Performance conversations are now ongoing in the form of check-ins, career conversations, and coaching where managers provide continuous insight and support. ”
Joe Ilvento

Joe Ilvento

Chief Learning Officer, Commvault

Connected Experiences

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Aligned Growth

A skills platform that connects everyone and everything

Intelligent Insight

Purpose-built AI engines that do the heavy lifting for you

Connected Experiences

An individualized & self-driven growth experience for people

Open Architecture

Designed for seamless connections and maximum flexibility

Aligned Growth

A skills platform that connects everyone and everything

Intelligent Insight

Purpose-built AI engines that do the heavy lifting for you

Cornerstone is more than a product; we’re your partner

Cornerstone is more than a product, we're your partner.

For more than two decades, we've been at the forefront of talent and people innovation, helping our customers stay ahead of the curve. Our team of experts deeply understands your unique talent challenges and opportunities with an unwavering focus on our customers' success. Together, we will work hand-in-hand with you to deliver extraordinary experiences and the results that matter to your organization.

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Cornerstone Report Details Effects of Toxic Employees in the Workplace

Blog Post

Cornerstone Report Details Effects of Toxic Employees in the Workplace

Toxic employees - we all know them when we work with them. They are the folks that always have something negative to say in a meeting. The ones who join the conference call halfway in, if they even bother to show up. They not only cause frustration, they can cause significant damages to the workplace. Toxic employees make their teammates 54 percent more likely to quit and cost employers up to three times more in hiring fees, according to our latest report, "Toxic Employees in the Workplace." Looking at data of 63,000 hired employees spanning approximately 250,000 observations, our report identifies the factors that make someone likely to engage in toxic behavior, as well as quantifies the impact of toxic employees on their co-workers and employers. We focused on the damages caused by individuals who engaged in "toxic behavior," defined as misconduct, workplace violence, drug or alcohol abuse, sexual harassment, falsification of documents, fraud and other direct violations of company policy. The report shows that toxic employees have a fairly negligible effect on the performance of their co-workers, which suggests that they have a stronger influence on stress and burnout than on day-to-day task completion. This causes good employees to be 54 percent more likely to quit when they have a toxic employee on their team. As toxic employees make their co-workers significantly more likely to leave, replacement costs rise greatly; hiring a single toxic employee into a team of twenty workers costs approximately $12,800, whereas hiring a non-toxic employee costs an employer an average of $4,000. It’s easy to spot these individuals once they’ve joined an organization, but what’s much more difficult—and much more useful—is to identify them before they’ve been extended an offer. Using data from hiring assessments, the report found that certain types of responses were indicative of toxic behavior. For example, employees who considered themselves "rule followers" are 33 percent more likely to be toxic employees. Applicants who were notably overconfident about their technical proficiencies for a job were 43 percent more likely to engage in toxic behavior. Thankfully, there are measures an employer can make to identify a toxic employee before they’ve joined an organization. Online science-based hiring assessments that utilize data analytics and intelligence tools can identify applicants who are more qualified for the job, as well as predictors of toxic behaviors. Of note is that a candidate who is deemed to be highly qualified by Cornerstone Selection is 19 percent less likely to be a toxic employee who is terminated for a policy violation. Toxic employees affect not only large employers but also the honest, hardworking co-workers who are subjected to their disruptive behavior. The fact that these behaviors can be predicted by an online assessment and avoided before they occur should offer some relief to employers and employees alike. Learn more about our new research exposing the Hidden Costs of "Toxic Employees". Learn more about how to build a recruiting action plan.

It's Time to Redefine the 'Why' of Performance Management

Blog Post

It's Time to Redefine the 'Why' of Performance Management

Everyone is talking about it. Most people hate it. Almost everyone thinks it needs at least a few major revisions. The words "bureaucratic," "time-consuming" and "waste of time" are often used when describing it. In recent years, it has gotten a lot of press as HR leaders rush to read about companies like Accenture, Adobe, GE, Deloitte and others who have "fixed" it. What is it? I'm talking about performance management. A Brief History of Performance Management Do you remember how performance management found its way into the workforce? In the 1980s and early 1990s, compensation ruled the HR world; compensation folks were responsible for doling out pay increases. Right about that time, equal pay and issues of fairness were increasingly prominent, and performance management became the tool for determining pay in a defensible and fair manner. Here's how it worked: Performance reviews were written, scored and delivered once a year, along with communication about the annual pay increase (merit). In 1990, the typical merit budget went up to 14 percent, which created a discernible gap between high and low performers. But over the years, as merit budgets shrank, the concept of "pay for performance" stuck around stubbornly—even when the difference between a top performer and a poor performer was barely two percent of the budget. HR put the proverbial lipstick on performance appraisal programs by calling it "performance management," but over the years, the process that birthed the baby hasn't changed—even though merit budgets have dwindled to insignificance. A Loss of Focus Thus, we have today's scramble to change a program that leads to disgruntled leadership and employees, and doesn't do what it should do: manage performance. (Or better said, improve performance.) Perhaps it is time to go back to the "why." What is the business goal of performance management? Let's start here. If we buy the idea that organizational performance is the work of the leaders and employees, it stands to reason that leaders and employees need to know what is expected of them, as well as have the knowledge, skills and tools to meet these expectations. This includes receiving regular feedback. This becomes your "why." Define Your Purpose It isn't enough for HR to design and implement a program, even if the CEO says "Do it." First of all, there is too much baggage associated with the concept for even a perfect program to get a fair shake. As a second point, this is hard work; it take strength, confidence, skill and commitment for leaders to spend time defining expectations and providing helpful, developmental feedback to their employees. There are some who, unless they are held accountable, will do a half-hearted job. That won't move the needle on individual or organizational performance. So, what is the answer? Get leaders to agree to the purpose of performance management and give them a compelling business reason to make the investment. A business reason with hard, bottom-line results. Do they want to increase revenue, reduce expenses, decrease turnover, etc.? If so, you have a compelling business case. You must start with the "why." Only then can you address the how. In my next post, I'll share some thoughts about that. Photo: Twenty20

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