ブログ投稿

Why Starbucks' Unconscious Bias Training Probably Won't Change Much

Carol Anderson

Founder, Anderson Performance Partners

Starbucks made a splash recently by closing 8,000 stores to provide unconscious bias training for over 100,000 employees. The company decided on this widespread training after an employee stopped two black men from using their onsite restroom in a Philadelphia store.

As a former Chief Learning Officer at multiple organizations, I don't think this training will change much. And, as a consultant, I can also guess what this training may have cost Starbucks. So why pay for something that likely won't stop this situation from happening in the future? The short answer is because it is easier to "train" people for a half day than to do the challenging work of creating an infrastructure of leadership and a culture of diversity and acceptance.

The first of Starbucks' three stated values is "Creating a culture of warmth and belonging, where everyone is welcome." Sounds easy. After all, we all want to be welcoming to everyone, right? In practice, however, it's not that simple. As humans, we bring complexity, variability, and, sometimes, bias to the table whether we realize it or not, and four hours of training alone won't change that.

To drive real change, organizations need leaders who understand their role in shaping behaviors, and it's up to these leaders to teach employees how to best represent the image of the organization in their work.

Here are four practical ways leaders can shape culture and behavior on their teams:

Don't Hide Behind the Scenes

If you're a leader, your office is a great place to hole up and get work done, but that's not where the real leadership happens. The real work of an organization takes place where employees work—in front of customers, with the products.

Being a leader means regularly listening, observing and, when appropriate, immediately intervening to acknowledge behavior that is exceptional, or reprimand behavior that must change. Make it part of your routine to be present and active, side-by-side with employees.

Be Aware of the Situation

Your presence alone isn't enough. Leaders must view the workplace and their employees through a critical lens—the values of the organization. That means being open to noticing, as in Starbucks' case, when that culture of belonging and warmth is violated.

Using a values filter may not be second nature, particularly because this type of leadership is a time-consuming and all-encompassing work. It's critical for leaders to see beyond their point of view, embrace the organization's values and coach them, thereby shaping behaviors that represent the values.

Match Worker Demographics to Customer Demographics

Organizations are increasingly making an effort to hire a more diverse workforce, and there's a valid business reason for that—employees who share the culture and background of the customer base will be better able to meet the customer needs because they're more likely to have similar needs. An employee demographic that represents the customer demographic can also help ensure that products fit the culture of the local presence.

Find Teachable Moments

Leaders sometimes view coaching and feedback as something that's provided to employees only when they're doing something wrong. As a result, they are uncomfortable providing feedback regularly because they think it sends the wrong message to workers. But by adopting a teaching mentality, leaders can view feedback as a good thing—a learning or developmental opportunity rather than a corrective one. A mindset of continuous learning goes a long way for opening up a meaningful dialogue.

Leaders who understand that shaping their culture is an ongoing process, and approach it from a long-term learning and engagement lens can generate excitement about their organization's value. And that excitement typically lasts a whole lot longer and is much more effective than a four hour training session.

Photo: Unsplash

Related Resources

Want to keep learning? Explore our products, customer stories, and the latest industry insights.

お客様やパートナーとの 新しい協力関係を目指して

データシート

お客様やパートナーとの 新しい協力関係を目指して

急速な変化を続ける業務環境では、従来のやり方にとらわれ ない適応力が求められます。重要なステークホルダーの関心 をどうやって組織全体の方向性に重ねていくかは、今までにな い優先事項となっています。お客様のビジネスに合わせて柔 軟に対応できるよう設計されているコーナーストーン社外向 けトレーニングは、組織の成長に合わせ、社外の利用者にも 最新の情報と学習内容を提供します。

株式会社アルバック:履修率100%を実現する教育ポータル

お客様事例

株式会社アルバック:履修率100%を実現する教育ポータル

アルバックは1952 年、「若い世代の未来を真空で豊かにしたい」「真空技術で産業と科学の発展に貢献しよう」という若い技術者の理念のもと、6 人の当時の財界有力者が出資者となって誕生した企業です。真空技術は現在でも欠かせないもので、液晶フラットパネルディスプレイ、半導体、電子部品、さらには自動車、食品、医薬品など多くの生産工程でアルバックの真空技術が使われています。 アルバックの事業は国内にとどまりません。現在では国内の売上が約35%、海外の売上が65%とグローバルに展開し、国内外のグループ会社は世界49 社になります。 グローバル化の展開に伴い、各国の生産現場からあがってきたのが、「わからないことがあっても、どこに聞けばよいのかがわからない」という声でした。従来は日本から技術者を派遣し、技術伝承を行ってきましたが、グローバル展開が加速して拠点数が増え、人財育成の要望が増えた一方で、国内のベテランの定年による減少に伴い、需要を満たすだけのベテラン社員を派遣することが難しくなっていたのです。従来とは異なる新たな社内教育の仕組みを作る必要に迫られました。 そこで2015 年から、生産本部のスタッフが中心となって、教育の仕組み作りが進められました。 その際に教育プラットフォームとして選択されたのがコーナーストーンオンデマンドのソリューションでした。この取り組みは社内で高く評価され、生産本部だけの利用にとどまらず、現在では教育部門の人財センターで全社員を対象に利用されるようになっています。2019 年6 月末までにグループ全体となる6400 人の利用を見込みます。 コーナーストーンを選んだ理由とは? 中国駐在から帰ったアルバックの廣瀬知子氏(人財センター 副参事)は、「海外のグループ会社でも利用できる教育の仕組みを作らねばならない」と痛感していました。グループ会社に専門教育を実施し、生産性を上げることが命題でした。当時、廣瀬氏は生産本部に所属していましたが、駐在先の中国で、現地のグループ会社社員が必要な情報を得たくても得ることができない状況を目の当たりにしていたのです。 帰任後、生産本部で利用する新しい教育システムを探し始めた廣瀬氏は、展示会でコーナーストーンのソリューションを知りました。 「コーナーストーン・ラーニングは人事のプロでなくても、使いやすそうな製品という印象でした。グループ会社がある海外でも使うことを想定していたため、多言語対応であり、また海外拠点でもサポートを受けることができるシステムが望ましいという判断もありました。」(廣瀬氏)コーナーストーンは、この点からもニーズに合致していました。廣瀬氏は中国やマレーシアなどの通信体制に懸念のある地域で導入デモンストレーションを行ったのち、コーナーストーンを導入しました。 コーナーストーンは、この点からもニーズに合致していました。廣瀬氏は中国やマレーシアなどの通信体制に懸念のある地域で導入デモンストレーションを行ったのち、コーナーストーンを導入しました。 2016年6月、契約後わずか3か月で社内教育のためのポータルサイトとしてeラーニングシステムが稼働しました。当初は利用者300人からのスタートでした。 長期出張者でも学習できる体制で、必須科目の履修率が大幅向上 eラーニングシステム導入以前、アルバックで行われていた社内教育のメインは集合教育でした。集合教育の様子をビデオで録画し、イントラネットの学習に利用することもありました。「わざわざeラーニングシステムを導入しなくても、これまで使っていたものをイントラネット経由で利用するだけで十分ではないか?」という声も社内からあがったと言います。 しかし廣瀬氏は、「従来の仕組みには欠点があったのです」と指摘します。「仕事の性質上、長期間客先に出張し、業務を行う社員がいます。従来の仕組みでは、出張先で学習することができませんでした。長期出張中であっても、必要な教育を出張先で受けることができるeラーニングが必要でした。」また、製造の現場にはサービス、安全、コンプライアンスといった必須で学習する必要があるコンテンツが数多く存在します。コーナーストーン・ラーニングでは、これら必須科目についても期限を決めて履修率を確認し、未履修の人には声かけをすることで履修を促すことができます。 コーナーストーンのeラーニングシステムをULVAC Academy Portalとして導入してから、長期出張中であっても学習できる体制が整いました。以前であれば、出張中で履修が難しかった人も含め、安全保障貿易管理基本教育など必須科目の履修率100%を実現することができるようになりました。」(廣瀬氏) 資格管理の把握が容易に また、生産現場から課題としてあがっていた、「資格管理」もこれから行っていきます。以前からイントラネットで資格取得者が何人いるのかを確認することはできたのですが、「資格を持っていない人が何人いるのか」、「期限付きの資格が切れる時期はいつなのか」といった資格管理のための情報は取得することはできませんでした。 コーナーストーン・ラーニングでは、社員の資格管理を一元管理できます。管理者が資格取得の状況や、資格が切れる時期も確認できるようになったので、仕事が始まる前に資格取得の学習をしてもらうよう指示を出すことができるようになりました。資格が切れて作業ができなくなる空白期間を作らないようにするよう、事前に対策をとることができます。 事前学習を促し、新しい業務への配置に応用 さらに、新しい仕事をしてもらう際には、資格の保有状況だけでなくこれまでの経験を管理者が確認し、新しい仕事に臨む準備を促すことができます。 「新しい装置を扱うための教材をコースで提供することで、事前に学習するモチベーションにつなげたいと考えています。またすでに履習した人を把握して、業務の配置などに応用することも検討できるようにしていきます。」(廣瀬氏) 生産本部から全社へ利用範囲が拡大 生産本部で始まったポータルは2017年度から全社で利用するシステムとなりました。廣瀬氏をはじめ、生産本部でシステムに関わっていたスタッフも人財育成部門の人財センター所属となりました。 全社で利用するものとなったことで、コンテンツの種類も広がりました。当初は生産部門向けが中心だったコンテンツに、会社の理念、歴史を紹介するものが加わりました。 また、社員が利用するポータルサイトとは別に、請負スタッフ向けポータルサイトを求める声があがったことで請負スタッフ向けポータルサイトが作られるなど、ニーズに合わせたシステムやコンテンツの充実がはかられています。 2019年6月末には、グループ会社も含めた全社員がeラーニングを利用できるようになる予定です。これが実現すれば、これまで行われてきたコンプライアンス、安全基本教育といった全社員必須の教育については、集合研修を撤廃し、eラーニングに置き換えることが計画されています。集合教育の場合、自分の業務とタイミングが合わず履修することができないケースがありますが、eラーニングであれば自分の都合が良い時に履修することができるため、全社員が履修しなければならない必須教育には適していると判断したからです。受講者と講師の両者の観点から効果と効率を考え、eラーニングと集合教育を使い分けていく方向です。 「今後は、社員がステップアップを望む際に利用できる教育コンテンツなど、教材を充実していくことが課題の1つです。もう1つの課題は、すでに提供されている教材の内容を簡単に紹介する要約や、ダイジェスト版動画を提供するなど、既存コンテンツの利用促進となるような仕掛け作りです。作ったものが使われないポータルサイトにしてはいけないと考えています」(廣瀬氏)

Workplace Diversity: ’The Era of Colorblindness is Over’

ブログ投稿

Workplace Diversity: ’The Era of Colorblindness is Over’

Workplace diversity is a pressing topic among HR pros. It's heavily scrutinized in blogs, at conferences and during training sessions. That attention often focuses on how diversity affects the company — but what about how minorities' experiences affect people personally and professionally? Google employee Erica Baker addressed that question recently on Medium with a first-person account of her experiences as a minority in the tech industry. Here, Dr. Kecia Thomas, a professor of industrial-organizational psychology at the University of Georgia, explains how individual workers' experiences can reverberate throughout an organization: How do the experiences of minority workers affect the entire company? The concerns of under-represented workers often represent the concerns of other workers, as well. The issues that minority workers might experience are not all that different from the experiences of people who were the first generation to go to college in their families, or people who might come from a lower economic class. Attending to diversity actually helps to improve the workforce overall. Some of the challenges for ethnic minority workers, for example, are that they often find themselves as one-of-a-kind in their workplace. I’m talking about high-level professionals, people with graduate degrees and above. There are implicit biases that might hinder their access to informal networks, to mentoring or to professional development opportunities that could subsequently impair their performance and career development. I think there are also experiences that newcomers face in regard to feeling invisible and voiceless. How do these biases affect people in the majority? It’s not a stretch to say that the lack of exposure for many white colleagues can also be a source of anxiety that can inhibit their opportunity for authentic interactions with a new colleague who is different, ethnically or culturally. Any time we have those barriers to communication or to establishing authentic relationships, it’s a potential barrier to our performance and our ability to work together productively. Whose role is it to consider these issues within a company — and to take steps to address them? When it comes to any type of organizational change, it always begins at the top. Leaders have to understand demographic shifts in their labor force, how those shifts might be reflected — and the needs and priorities of their workers. When leaders are committed to a diverse and inclusive workplace, HR is empowered to put in place the strategies that are equally effective across a diversity of workers. There’s also a culture of the organization that has to be addressed to make sure that people are held accountable if they violate non-discrimination and anti-harassment policies. Too often, companies don’t have clear policies, or they're not communicated effectively. And even if they’re communicated effectively, they’re not always followed. We are at a critical point as a nation in regard to how we address diversity. We are seeing a lot of blatant forms of discrimination and violence occur, but we’re also seeing a younger generation that is so multicultural and inclusive. We’re seeing an increasing number of states embrace same-sex marriage. So there’s kind of a tidal wave of issues going on that reflect our differences. We have an opportunity to do this well and see this as a way to promote innovation, creativity and greater collaboration. A lot of the research I’ve done with Vicky Plaut [professor of law and social science at the University of California, Berkeley] suggests that we need to embrace multiculturalism and that the era of colorblindness is over. In fact, colorblindness is a signal to members of ethnic and racial minority groups that they are now vulnerable to discrimination. Photo: Can Stock

お気軽にお問合わせください

人財管理に関して、ご要望、お困りごとについて、コーナーストーンにご相談ください。

© Cornerstone 2022
法的事項