UK Regional Report: Addressing the Global Skills Shortage

Research

UK Regional Report: Addressing the Global Skills Shortage

The new realities of work are creating long-term impacts — good and bad — for your organisation and people. The organisations that aren't struggling to navigate this uncharted wilderness succeed because they focus on developing the skills of their people. Learn how successful organisations worldwide use skills to ensure they and their people are thriving post-pandemic and how your organisation can do it too. Download this eBook to learn: How high-performing organisations are leading with skills The employer vs employee confidence gap The current state of skills development around the world Practical tactics from leading with skills and becoming an HPO

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Solvus offers users greater insight into their coaching programmes, thanks to Cornerstone

Customer Story

Solvus offers users greater insight into their coaching programmes, thanks to Cornerstone

How do you find the best talent with the right, future-proof skills? Many organisations are currently struggling with this challenge. Belgian company Solvus supports organisations in their search and helps them resolve their talent needs. Solvus doesn’t just look for the right match, it also looks for (undiscovered) talent already present in the organisation. The company focuses on total talent management (TTM) and integrates an array of strategies for developing existing employees and attracting permanent and flexible talent. Solvus is a Belgian HR service provider, established in 2014 under the RGF Staffing umbrella, which was formerly known in the Netherlands as USG People. The organisation offers HR support such as recruitment process outsourcing (RPO), managed service provider (MSP) programmes, redeployment and outplacement, assessments, and development centres. But Solvus is mainly known as a pioneer in the Belgian market for its TTM solutions. These are integrated and complementary HR solutions designed to make companies more efficient, more resilient, and more flexible in all HR areas. In other words: Solvus focuses on people’s potential rather than checking whether they already have the skills requested for a particular vacancy. Digitalisation as a must-have For some time now, Solvus has been looking to further digitalise its services. The coronavirus pandemic reinforced this desire: digitalisation was no longer a nice-to-have but had become a must-have. Franz Hegemann, Operational Excellence Manager at Solvus, outlines the need to modernise the job coaching programmes: “We were facing a range of problems. First of all, the workflow involved a lot of manual work. In these programmes, we work with many different coaches and it was very difficult to implement a uniform way of working. Furthermore, the individual projects were tracked in Excel – a classic solution, but not a very practical one if you’re working with many people at the same time. A third issue was reporting: it was extremely hard to create an overview of what exactly was going on and see the status of each coaching programme.” According to Hegemann, it was quite clear to Solvus what the new solution should be capable of. “We were looking for a tool that would give us an overview of all the different active coaching programmes and their status – all in one place. The result should be a complete, uniform, and transparent process, which we could monitor and follow up where necessary. Another important point was privacy and GDPR compliance. Our ultimate objective was to provide even higher quality services and at the same time, increase our efficiency.” VDAB coaching At the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, the VDAB (Flemish Service for Employment and Vocational Training) was looking to outsource the provisioning of proactive and preventative mediation to job seekers with recent work experience, ensuring a smooth return to the labour market. The main difference between this and previous projects Solvus had carried out for the VDAB was that this was to be a voluntary programme. Hegemann explains: “This meant that we had to have something attractive to offer: a modern and professional-looking user interface which would be appealing for potential users.” Solvus started looking for a suitable solution internally. Hegemann continues, “We looked within RGF Staffing to see if there was anything we could reuse. But because of the specific needs of the service we wanted to offer, there was nothing suitable.” The search continued outside of the organisation, where the option to modify the configuration played a significant role. “We were looking for an SaaS solution where we wouldn’t be dependent on the developer to make changes to the system. And that had an impact on our own organisation, because we had to train people to work this way. However, we have also experienced other solutions where you have to generate a ticket for even the smallest issue and wait until someone has time to tackle your problem. That’s not very flexible, nor is it the dynamic way of working we have come to expect.” Too many options After discussions with a number of LMS suppliers, Solvus chose Cornerstone. It was a considerable challenge to implement the Cornerstone solution, explains Anjuli Devuyst, team leader at Solvus and responsible for VDAB’s projects: “Cornerstone is built for the interaction between manager and employee. We had to adapt that to coach/coachee, which was quite a challenge. The Cornerstone software can do a great deal, but we also had to work with the MLP system that VDAB was already using. VDAB requires all its partners to use this system to ensure all actions are properly followed up. An important issue to consider was where we would register what data, and how we could avoid duplicate data. So the main question for us was: what functionality is essential and what can we leave out?” After a three-month implementation period, the system was ready for use. Devuyst is very happy with Cornerstone: “Our administration has become a lot simpler. In the past, our documentation was stored in various locations – now everything is in one place. We only have to look at two systems: Cornerstone and the client’s system. This means our employees don’t have to switch between so many systems, leaving less room for error. What’s more, we can easily get useful reports from the system. Thanks to Cornerstone, we can now work more efficiently. That’s the biggest advantage for us.” Taking control People in the VDAB programme are also very positive about Cornerstone. Devuyst reports, “Clients can take the initiative and immediately see what’s going on in their own programme. Cornerstone also enables us to link to e-learning modules and videos produced by our own clients and suppliers, so the entire product offering – our own and what is produced by third parties – is available in the same place. We’re currently expanding our e-learning offering so the options will soon be even greater.” The next step for Solvus is to add more projects to the Cornerstone platform. Some of these projects will be similar to the current one, so the implementation will not be entirely new. But Solvus is also looking further ahead. For example, they are investigating the option of using Cornerstone for assessment centres, where companies can determine whether an employee is ready for the next career step, and whether a candidate is suitable for a particular job. Interface with internal systems Another item on Solvus’s wishlist was interfacing some of their other systems with Cornerstone. Hegemann explains, “We have an enormous talent pool that we have built from our coaching programmes. These candidates are potential matches to vacancies that Solvus is trying to fill for organisations on the other side of the business. We have not yet realised this interface between Cornerstone and other platforms, but it’s certainly something we want to build towards. Our objective is to always help coachees find a new job. And considering we have a large pool of vacancies and job openings, this mapping would be a win-win for all involved.”

Glencore’s bespoke ethics and compliance training boosts employee engagement globally

Customer Story

Glencore’s bespoke ethics and compliance training boosts employee engagement globally

Glencore is one of the world’s largest global diversified natural resource companies and a major producer and marketer of more than 60 responsibly sourced commodities that advance everyday life. Through a network of assets, customers and suppliers that spans the globe, it produces, processes, recycles, sources, markets and distributes the commodities that enable decarbonisation while meeting the energy needs of today. Glencore companies employ around 135,000 people, including contractors. With a strong footprint in over 35 countries in both established and emerging regions for natural resources, our marketing and industrial activities are supported by a global network of more than 40 offices. Glencore's customers are industrial consumers, such as those in the automotive, steel, power generation, battery manufacturing and oil sectors. We also provide financing, logistics and other services to producers and consumers of commodities. GLENCORE’S TRAINING CHALLENGES Glencore has invested significant resources over the last number of years to build and implement a best-in class ethics and compliance program and has made significant investments in systems. Glencore recognised that to effectively embed ethical behaviors as a strategic corporate and cultural objective, it would need to adopt a refreshed approach, one which worked globally and communicated the company’s Values and expectations to everyone in a simple and effective way. One of the solutions to tackle this challenge was to work strategically with two key partners, Cornerstone and SAI360, to identify the training needs, design appropriate and engaging learning content and deliver it to the target audiences in an impactful manner. The company realized that the success or failure of this important undertaking would be determined by its approach to a number of specific logistical challenges, including: Geographically remote locations with low bandwidth that could not handle video-and image-heavy content due to internet connectivity. Diverse sets of employees requiring training to be translated into 11 languages. A large variety of employee roles that necessitated Glencore’s training be tailored and relevant for individual groups. A large global presence that made tracking and reporting training progress essential and required streamlined delivery. A large population of frontline workers, most of whom don’t have access to online training. Glencore reviewed several off-the-shelf content offerings but quickly discovered that they didn’t meet the needs identified. In addition, most of the content seemed to only focus on specific industries such as Financial Services and Pharmaceuticals, which did not reflect Glencore’s core business. Furthermore, there was not enough focus in these off-the-shelf trainings on how employees can turn to the company’s Values for guidance in decision making. TURNING TO CORNERSTONE AND SAI360 To address its training challenges, Glencore turned to Cornerstone and its expansive content partner network. Through this first move, Glencore implemented Cornerstone’s widely used Learning Management System (LMS) to digitally transform training across its workforce. The LMS offered Glencore the ability to group its employees in different categories thereby allowing for targeted training assignments. Cornerstone also offers an app that would enable some of Glencore’s frontline and more remote workers to access training courses on their mobile devices. The LMS functions as a one-stop shop for employees and, because of this ease of use, was a clear choice for Glencore. Other benefits Glencore saw in Cornerstone included: A large and experienced support team with key project management skills. The ability to host large quantities of content on servers globally, making it more accessible. Varying administrative rights at the corporate, regional and local levels to ensure a smooth global rollout of annual compliance training completions. Email notifications and automated reminders, escalations and managerial oversight to review, assign and track training. Robust reporting within the LMS that allows Glencore to track in-depth information about employee progress and knowledge retention. The ability to access the effectiveness of its training through deployment of feedback surveys. Cornerstone and SAI360 have collaborated through a strategic partnership for several years, leveraging each other’s expertise as needed. As a leader in the compliance industry and a trusted partner, the volume and variety of courses and topics in SAI360’s library of content is unmatched. SAI360 also has the in-house expertise and capability to transform and manage a training program of Glencore’s size and scope. As a global compliance specialist, SAI360 is able to offer: A comprehensive compliance content library. Bespoke and configurable content to match Glencore’s unique needs. Top-tier translation services supporting 60+ languages. An Instructional Design team to craft an engaging learning experience supported by a robust network of legal SMEs. Dedicated Customer Success Manager for training initiatives. An internal Project Management team committed to managing the full life-cycle of the project. Solutions for co-branded content. Continuous library updates with the latest regulatory changes and new, relevant scenarios. Glencore now had two companies working in tandem to improve its employee compliance training experience. Cornerstone provided the system that allowed for better training management as well as program access for geographically distributedemployees, while SAI360 worked with Glencore to tailor trainings to specific roles and their risk exposure. COMBINING CORNERSTONE AND SAI360 This expert partnership has been pivotal to helping Glencore achieve its compliance training aspirations. Training content quality has risen to the standards the company was aiming for with more focus and relevance for its employees. Through SAI360, Glencore now offers four core courses for its employees: Code of Conduct, Anti-Corruption and Bribery, Conflicts of Interest, and GDPR/Data Protection and Privacy. These have each been customized to fit the unique needs of Glencore and are better targeted towards the employees who present the highest risk for each of these subjects. An added feature is the ability to track employee confidence in the behavioral decisions they make during the scenario-based learning. This has been a journey for all involved. SAI360 and Glencore first focused on streamlining the comprehensive 45-minute learning sessions which proved too time-intensive and detailed for employees. The companies then worked together to design an experience that focused on behaviors more than theory, focusing on real-life situations that employees might encounter at work. By cutting out the excess information that didn’t help their employees do their jobs, most trainings were reduced to 15-minute sessions. Glencore had also emphasized to SAI360 and Cornerstone the need for an effective training assignment and tracking system, to further improve employee satisfaction as well as ensure that each course was tailored to the right audience. This was a key requirement for Glencore. Subsequently, 50,000+ employees and contractors were classified in the LMS by function and/or roles, based on the company’s compliance risk rating. HOW CORNERSTONE AND SAI360 DELIVERED Cornerstone and SAI360 partnered to enhance Glencore’s compliance training program by delivering creative solutions, clear communications and measurable goals. The optimization of content with bespoke branding and improved data collection met the expectations set out by Glencore. Together, SAI360 and Cornerstone designed and implemented a customized system for Glencore featuring: Transparency through Reporting – It is now possible to track employees who may not have company email addresses, and link users from various HR systems. Data tracking and reporting are now much more sophisticated than before. Improved Assigning – The system now has the option to assign trainings to various groups within Glencore. This has helped accommodate the company’s employee risk classification system and deliver trainings to the right people. Translations – The system supports 11 translations for Glencore’s diverse teams. Compliance Assistance – SAI360 ensured that Glencore would continue to have a dedicated compliance contact for project management of training initiatives. Engaging Content – Content is now available in an engaging format that is user-friendly and easy to understand. An Updated Library – A significant amount of custom content had to be created for Glencore’s program, leveraging the continual updates to SAI360’s library that focus on recent regulatory changes and pertinent scenarios. In addition, Glencore developed its own training in-house, targeted at high-risk employees. Improved Analytical Capabilities – The content created for Glencore was designed for maximum data output. Through the LMS and SAI360’s content, Glencore is able to view and report on the number of attempts on any interactive activities and measure how much information employees have retained. About SAI360 SAI360 is the leading provider of GRC, Learning, EHS, and Sustainability software. Its cloud-first SAI360 platform contains flexible, scalable, and configurable modules for a better vantage point on risk management. More information: sai360.com

NSPCC revamps learning strategy, with child wellbeing at its heart

Customer Story

NSPCC revamps learning strategy, with child wellbeing at its heart

The NSPCC’s mission is to prevent abuse and neglect. The landscape of safeguarding children has changed significantly in recent years. The arrival of COVID-19 made reaching and supporting vulnerable children, while their needs and risks were rising, all the more challenging. However, the pandemic also presented an opportunity for the NSPCC to innovate and test new ways of working, with digitalising workforce learning being a key example. The NSPCC looked to implement a learning strategy that would enable it to give the best possible care to as many children as possible within this ‘new normal’, and well into the future. With a mixture of paid employees and volunteers across the organisation – from managing apprenticeships to inducting ChildLine volunteers to prepare them to answer calls from young people – NSPCC’s learning needs were broad, and it was important for the new learning strategy to be and feel as inclusive as possible. Why Cornerstone The NSPCC has been working with Cornerstone for around nine years. However, it was the pandemic that propelled forward it’s overhaul of the organisation’s approach to learning and development. Pulse surveys had shown that, employees had felt that the charity’s approach to learning was a ‘postcode lottery’, with some areas of the organisation having greater access to resources than others. Many employees also saw learning in a traditional ‘classroom-style’ sense. Instead, the NSPCC wanted to roll out a system whereby employees and volunteers had equal access to the relevant learning solutions and were able to self-direct their own learning journeys. The NSPCC wanted to leverage a system that would provide greater understanding of the organisation’s skills, knowledge, and capability gaps. Identifying these gaps would enable the NSPCC to offer targeted learning to those who needed it, as well as ensuring consistent and up-to-date knowledge existed across all employees and volunteers. The NSPCC sought a learning solution that would be easily available and accessible to all, and that kept it true to its purpose – providing the best possible support to children through a highly skilled and capable workforce. The Results Improvements in EDI initiatives: The NSPCC’s mandatory unconscious bias training was launched in 2020 and has since seen a 99% completion rate. The NSPCC also adopted a 360 appraisal for its leaders whereby feedback is given on their inclusive leadership behaviours. This feedback then forms part of their annual performance review, incentivising progress and creating leaders who listen and learn. Shortened timeline for ChildLine induction training: The previous induction training model was localised and resource heavy. Instead, the NSPCC centralised its model to deliver training that was of a higher quality, more digestible and slashed delivery timeframes. Volunteers can now complete training online at times to suit them. A Volunteer Hub was also created to inspire a learning community amongst volunteers. Increased workforce engagement: An emotional resilience course delivered by training partners LEVELheaded has so far been completed by over 629 staff members, with one employee claiming it was “one of the most useful workshops” they had ever taken part in. Supporting people to build their resilience toolkit is an important part of the people development wellness approach at the NSPCC, and 94% of employees said they were aware of the tools and resources available to support them. This includes an open-source mindfulness platform created by Cognitive Behavioural Hypnotherapist Alex James. Manager Development Programme: This new values and behaviours programme for all managers across the NSPCC looks to enable, equip and empower managers to manage in a consistent ’NSPCC way’. This enables the NSPCC to deliver its strategy through its people, with managers as the lynchpins of people engagement. Apprenticeships: The NSPCC has seen an 800% increase in the number of apprenticeships started in 2021 compared to previous years. True to its value of ‘working together’ the NSPCC collaborated with others in the sector firstly to trailblaze a Fundraising apprenticeship and now seeks to create a new Volunteer Management apprenticeship.

Trends at Work

Introducing an exclusive partnership with WaitWhat's Masters of Scale for an entirely new learning experience

Datasheet

Introducing an exclusive partnership with WaitWhat's Masters of Scale for an entirely new learning experience

You asked for popular podcast modalities and we delivered through a partnership with WaitWhat’s Masters of Scale. Check out lessons about building teams, developing products and scaling companies from the world's top leaders, now available in multiple Cornerstone Content Anytime subscriptions.

Putting Your People at the Centre of Business Success

Video

Putting Your People at the Centre of Business Success

Hear how Pret a Manger, Thames Water and Unibail-Rodamco-Westfield focused on their people to adapt their businesses to change in the uncertain times through 2020 and beyond.

Strategy is compatible with company culture

Blog Post

Strategy is compatible with company culture

What makes a real corporate culture? It encompasses the values, ethos and morality of an organisation. These values ​​are defined by executives, but it is up to HR to implement, mediate, and, if necessary, change these elements within organisations. In addition to the implementation of new corporate strategies, the right approach to solving digital change is with the employees. It is the workforce that has to deal with the new developments in a practical and active manner and incorporate the strategies on a daily basis. For this reason, it is vital to establish the best possible corporate culture. Here’s some clues to agree your strategy and corporate culture: Flexibility for HR If a company wants to change through its employees, this also means HR needs to re-establish itself. HR must position itself differently and, as a result, act as a strategic partner, instead of presenting itself as an aid to the management. Take Risks The fact that companies are often afraid of risks lies in the nature of the matter. Nevertheless, there are always phases in economic development, where risks are important. Digital change is one of these risks. It is also the only way to promote innovation and creativity. Leadership means not only to command, but also to inspire. Creating new digital strategies may be a risk but no culture can develop without even exploring its limits. Each manager must ask his or herself whether they are ready, to take the risk. Speed ​​up the transfer of knowledge Interlink your organisation in terms of learning. According to Cornerstone’s A License to Skill: Embracing the Reskilling Revolution report, there remains a confidence gap between organisations and their people when it comes to skills development suggesting investments in learning may not currently produce the desired outcome for your people. This breakdown in communication cannot be solved by further investments though, you first need to establish a learning environment. The scientists McCall, Lombardo and Morrison showed in 1988 that employees learn 10 percent through formal further education, 20 percent from colleagues and 70 percent by challenges. Successful managers should encourage their employees to learn autodidactically with their colleagues at the workplace. Investment in internal social networks – based on the rules of the collaboration functions – should not be stopped but encouraged. The goal must be unified learning processes in which the collaboration and sharing of knowledge among colleagues are the focus. This will accelerate the exchange of knowledge enormously and improve the efficiency of employees.  Consolidation Over the past few years, a highly-fragmented system has developed, which makes it difficult for companies to coordinate their network environment. The consequences are often unclear procedures and high costs, which lead to conflicts within the team and harm company culture. Large organisations often use different systems in each of their offices which are repeatedly incompatible. All processes and standards of a company should be standardised to consolidate internal processes. This will prevent disturbances and create transparency across the company. Communication Transparency allows teams across the company to understand all of the processes and to see themselves as part of a larger unit. Practices that actively promote this and are available to managers are, for example, performance reviews and employee interviews that take place not only quarterly or annually but continuously. Corporate strategy and corporate culture do not have to take separate paths, but represent two sides of a medal. The factors that make up the culture are like the oil in a machine consisting of innovation and success. This blog originally published in July 2017 and updated in November 2020.

Skills Building

LMS vs. LXP vs. TXP – A Complete Guide to Help You Decide What You Need

Blog Post

LMS vs. LXP vs. TXP – A Complete Guide to Help You Decide What You Need

The Utility of LMS, LXP, and TXP For many years, the Learning Management System (LMS) has been the foundation of the Learning and Development (L&D) technology. For many years, companies have questioned how technology can be best used to manage their training strategy. And within L&D itself, there were three camps: believers in face-to-face learning, those who were passionate about working with people, and the future-gazing few who loved e-learning tech and claimed that the future was digital. The LMS The “LMS” brought all three worlds together. Training sessions were managed, with enrollments for the classroom captured, joining instructions issued. It also became the place where e-learning could live. The world of L&D became more and more familiar with “SCORM” (Sharable Content Object Reference Model) and other such L&D tech jargon. In essence, there was an acceptance that learning could take the form of both e-learning and in-person learning. As the name suggests, the focus of the LMS was “Management” – the technology-empowered the company to ensure that proper training happened. The current technological landscape has pushed the boundaries of LMS. Yes, there is still the need to manage the required training, but learning is so much more than “training.” The LXP The LXP (Learning Experience Platform) has arisen out of a baseline belief that learning at work is an experience unique for everyone. Just as consumers have freed themselves of the constraints of the television schedule, high street shops, and radio schedules with on-demand services like Netflix, Spotify, and Amazon, corporate learners expect more than a top-down training schedule managed by their bosses. LXPs empower users to discover content from a variety of sources. They have become popular in suggesting personalised content, recommending third-party articles, index documents, videos, and other digital assets by deploying intelligent methods. The LXP embraces the fact that learning happens all the time in an almost infinite number of modalities. But there is a problem with this. Improving the Learning Experience is excellent (and necessary), but how can companies ensure they push the formal learning? The TXP The next chapter in the saga is the TXP (Talent Experience Platform). The TXP ensures that this improved learner experience aligns with the organisation’s goals and the world. Companies today need their employees to develop and learn new skills. The world is changing quicker than ever, with external factors like the pandemic and climate change altering the paradigm for the future of work. The TXP refers to a new employee experience. The end-user is presented with a consolidated platform that maximises the learning experience and guides the user on required skills related to the company’s unique situation. For example, if your company needs more Data Scientists, the TXP will promote these skills and roles to the current workforce, ensuring that the Talent can change where required. Functional Differences between LMS/LXP/TXP LMS The primary objective of an LMS is to distribute e-learning (or face-to-face learning) and administer the company’s internal training. These systems were designed to support critical functions, including registrations, validation workflows, and sign-up sheets for face-to-face training. With the content curated by L&D professionals, it is highly structured, aiding companies in organising and managing employee learning needs while tracking and managing content consumption. While LMSs offer content and user experience, they facilitate tracking progress and reporting learning performance. Primarily driven by internal Learning Administrators, LMSs don’t allow users to create and consume their content. They are typically management-centric systems for learning focused on business rules, compliance, and other organisational courses. LXP LXPs go above and beyond limited role content to create personalised learning experiences and help users discover new learning opportunities. With LXPs, users are in charge of their learning, not limited to consuming prescribed content. For instance, they house powerful search and personalisation functions to screen content from expansive and open-ended repositories. The open-architecture ecosystems and aggregators take learning beyond the company’s repository by integrating with external sources. This delivers better learning experiences and is set up with categorised content, much like streaming platforms, from which users can browse. They are designed to supplement L&D with broader skill development, micro-targeted towards enhancing specific domain/job-related skills. LXPs augment learning interactions by data-driven insightful feedback. This creates a holistic understanding of the impact between learning and on-job performance. With an adaptive learning ecosystem, learners can add new content and decide what to consume and how. Content on LXP can also be learner-generated by collating content from several external service providers for diverse content options. TXP A TXP starts with a user profile similar to social media applications such as LinkedIn. EdCast by Cornerstone's TXP creates an engaging environment using nudges and activities relevant to specific roles, employee journeys, and essential work activities. Our TXP is designed to be conversational. By leveraging videos, short messages, suggestions, chat, and mobile interfaces, the TXP can be seamlessly integrated into the workflow. Additionally, most TXPs, can be combined with existing communication software such as Slack, Microsoft Teams, etc. Unlike ERP systems, TXPs require no training. Intuitively designed, the UI is simple, making the end-users aware of the use/feature. Unlike integrated Talent Management systems, TXPs are focused, functional, and innovative. Our TXP can input data from the existing ERP or active directory to access user information without duplicating or replacing existing data. TXPs are built using the cloud, making them highly suited for the current digital landscape. The EdCast by Cornerstone TXP is highly adaptable with responsive interfaces and a well-developed mobile application. By integrating AI into its basic architecture, TXPs grow more intelligent and more predictive with time. Our TXP provides actionable insight by analysing data gained over several hundred employee journeys allowing for tailored recommendations. TXPs are designed to be fun and easy to use. The EdCast by Cornerstone TXP, for instance, has integrated gamification in the form of points, nudges and recommendations. This allows employees to connect, communicate and share knowledge with their peers. This encouragement will go a long way in building a better workplace. Top-down vs. Bottom-up The critical difference between LMS and LXP is that the LXP empowers employees/users to choose how and what content they want to consume. This fosters social and curation-based learning against the structured, organisational approach of an LMS where the company decides the content. In an LMS, the learning material is assigned to specific employee demographics based on business requirements such as compliance maintenance, responsibilities, onboarding, etc. LMS offers robust tools to help develop skills relevant to the industry or role through structured courses. These formal learning courses are an integral part of corporate L&D. In contrast, LXPs are designed for bite-sized content. This includes videos, podcasts, and animations. LXPs allow employees to contribute, share, or curate content. Additionally, an LXP will enable users to interact and build customised resources by offering learners their choice of content. Training delivered through LXPs delivers immersive learning experiences and is more responsive, personalised, and contextual than traditional LMS. This feature of LXPs has been vital for businesses to foster self-driven learning among employees. A TXP takes care of your organisational learning needs in today’s digital landscape while offering room for employees to independently learn. Additionally, a TXP allows users to focus on their development and career planning by looking at various courses and selecting them based on relevance and requirement. With business resilience increasingly critical, especially in the wake of the pandemic, assessing team-wide skills is imperative. EdCast by Cornerstone TXP allows organisations to build self-assessment and team assessment tools into the system. The Final Word While LMSs will continue to be a necessity among organisations, the road ahead will lead to TXPs growing popular by offering the best of LMS and LXP. EdCast by Cornerstone TXP extends and enhances the capabilities of traditional learning platforms by offering structure while enabling free-form learning. This helps employees understand the value addition they bring to the table while building long-term relationships with the company. Creating an effective TXP instills a sense of meaning, growth, teamwork, and healthy alignment once an employee is settled within the organisation. This goes a long way in enhancing the day-to-day employee experience to improve engagement and performance.

Spotlight on Amplifon: Making learning available anywhere and anytime

Customer Story

Spotlight on Amplifon: Making learning available anywhere and anytime

A history of excellence in hearing aids Founded in Italy in 1950, Amplifon is a leading multinational company in the hearing care retail market. Thanks to continuous research in the field of auditory prosthesis and in-depth studies in audiology, otolaryngology and phoniatrics, Amplifon supports its customers in their selection of the best hearing aids available. The company takes care of the entire process, from distribution through fitting to after-sales service, with customer relationship care being the Amplifon Group’s true added value. The Group features an Italian network of over 600 centres and more than 3,000 service points. On a global level, Amplifon operates 9,200 outlets in 25 countries and employs about 18,600 employees and contractors. Investing in people Amplifon’s objectives include offering an innovative experience to its customers, stimulating growth in key markets around the world, and developing an increasingly efficient company where people’s talent makes the difference. To fulfil the last point of its mission and lay the foundations on which the company’s future will rest, Amplifon has defined a five-year (2020-2025) training and development strategy. The integrated L&D plan outlined by the Group rests on four pillars: Amplifon awareness, to create awareness with respect to corporate strategy on what is happening in all the different organisational units, and how everyone contributes to the success of the Group. This will ensure that each individual has all the elements at his or her disposal to make decisions, and to make a difference every day. Digital empowerment, for an ever-deepening digitalisation of work environments, so that people become the focus once more. For Amplifon, technology helps automate repetitive tasks and gives people the tools they need to make the best use of their own intuition, ingenuity and thought processing. Amplifon connect, which includes mentorship, coaching and change management programs, with the aim of breaking down silos and creating connections and contacts across all different Group levels. Amplifon lead, with dedicated leadership and management courses aimed at preparing “People Managers” and “People Leaders” to play the key supporting role in enabling people to grow and become an example for the Group. Based on these four pillars, Amplifon set up a training course that offers: The same training opportunities to all employees, regardless of location or specific task – because Amplifon believes that knowledge should be limitless Access to training anywhere, at any time, and from any device – thus guaranteeing complete freedom according to each individual’s different needs The opportunity to develop technical and transferable skills such as creativity, imagination,gination, project management skills, ethics Engaging and stimulating content, thanks to gamification logic Prioritisation of training content, using algorithms that take into account people’s needs, preferences, and interests Tailored training for a future-ready workforce The pandemic has forced companies like Amplifon to redefine their priorities, opening their eyes once again to the importance of training and development. More specifically, the major changes experienced by the labour market over the last two years have prompted the company to invest today in the development of what will be the key skills of tomorrow. Amplifon has thus decided to offer its employees highly personalised courses with a strong focus on talent and skills. In order to do this, the company favours a “complete experience” approach, relying on a single common platform which can be accessed by the entire global workforce.This platform not only integrates harmoniously into the employees’ working life, but is also able to stimulate them through customised training content that will enhance their autonomy. In May 2021, Amplifon thus implemented Cornerstone 's learning platform. Cornerstone is a provider of adaptive human resources management solutions, and their training content has been made available at the same time to all Amplifon employees globally. Since then, thanks to its high level of customisation and ease of use, the platform has been used to strengthen the four pillars of the Group’s L&D strategy and, in particular, to develop functional and cross-functional skills. With regard to the former, Amplifon can finally provide tailor-made content, calibrated not only to current skills but also to skills that will be acquired over the coming years in order to remain competitive and further develop its employees' careers. With respect to cross-functional skills – given the speed of change to which every type of job is now subject – Amplifon has chosen to provide specific paths that delve into the themes of data analytics, change management and project management. The aim is to embrace learning in the flow of work and make it a reality. Training as a tool to overcome inequalities The biggest achievement to date is the substantial increase in the number of hours dedicated to training by employees; to date, on average, each employee has totalled 24 hours of training per year. Thanks to a mix of strategy and technology, important progress has been made in making training and development available anytime and anywhere, and fostering collaborative learning and employee engagement. Amplifon believes that training fosters equal opportunities for all, regardless of personal background, gender, age or place of origin. Knowledge cannot survive without sharing.

UK Regional Report: Addressing the Global Skills Shortage

Research

UK Regional Report: Addressing the Global Skills Shortage

The new realities of work are creating long-term impacts — good and bad — for your organisation and people. The organisations that aren't struggling to navigate this uncharted wilderness succeed because they focus on developing the skills of their people. Learn how successful organisations worldwide use skills to ensure they and their people are thriving post-pandemic and how your organisation can do it too. Download this eBook to learn: How high-performing organisations are leading with skills The employer vs employee confidence gap The current state of skills development around the world Practical tactics from leading with skills and becoming an HPO

Talent Strategy

How Westpac Banking accelerated onboarding with MyGuide

Customer Story

How Westpac Banking accelerated onboarding with MyGuide

Established in 1944, the World Bank Group is headquartered in Washington, D.C. With 189 member countries, staff from more than 170 countries, and offices in over 130 locations, the World Bank Group is a unique global partnership working on the mission to implement sustainable solutions to reduce poverty and build shared prosperity in developing countries. As part of a larger strategic plan, Westpac was required to revamp and strengthen its technology environment. The company rolled out a new banking platform and needed to onboard employees to the new system without spending time and energy training, documenting, and organising workshops. Westpac also needed to transfer knowledge from subject matter experts to new hires and colleagues in a scalable manner. Need for digital transformation Westpac’s IT transformation journey led to replacing multiple legacy HR and financial systems with new applications. The project was of such an immense nature that achieving total adoption of the new system would be difficult. And slow adoption threatened Westpac's ability to gain value from their billions of IT spend quickly. Westpac also rolled out a new banking platform to thousands of employees, including lenders, credit managers, and assessors. Their platform automates and streamlines an end-to-end process for a loan from start to finish. The most challenging problem for the bank was to quickly close loan applications to their customers. Any large-scale project requires an incredible amount of training and support from SMEs across the business. And there was no guarantee that employees would retain knowledge after the training sessions. Westpac realized that users who had access to support in the “flow of work” were more likely to be more proficient within the system and adopt the digital tool than those who only remember training sessions. Westpac’s structure is incredibly agile and requires resources to jump across various projects. Systems, processes, and installation can vary as employees enter new spaces, requiring them to quickly learn the inner workings of an application, business process, workflow, or transaction. This presents a unique challenge of training employees on new systems to achieve desired efficiency and quick onboarding for Westpac employees. The above business challenges required Westpac to look for an in-app training and digital adoption platform to enable contextual guided learning or Learning in the “Flow of Work” at scale. MyGuide, an EdCast by Cornerstone product, offers this exact experience to digital users. EdCast by Cornerstone MyGuide solution To overcome the challenges of faster onboarding, enable digital learning, boost knowledge sharing between employees and increase productivity, Westpac uses MyGuide from EdCast by Cornerstone. They do this through a self-serve model where content is “on-demand” and conveniently delivered inside core applications in order to accelerate the digital adoption of new applications used globally. MyGuide drives engagement and in-app support to ensure that Westpac’s human capital and tacit internal knowledge are shared across the organisations without needing hands-on training or IT support. This allows experts at Westpac to make valuable contributions to internal processes so that best practices are well-known and consistently practiced. User Onboarding MyGuide provides step-by-step guidance as an overlay to the Westpac application with audio/video in native languages. MyGuide enables trainers to easily create multiple interactive on-screen guides that allow users to quickly and accurately complete many complex tasks. This core functionality is known as “GuideMe.” Content created as a guide can also be available as a PDF, PPT, DOC, GIF, and video. This is called “ShowMe.” Workflow Automation In addition to being learned, they can also automate guides. This removes any potential for human error while performing a task and allows users to spend their time on other meaningful tasks. This is called “DoItForMe.” Content Accessibility Next, MyGuide gives users the flexibility to access in-app guides across web browsers so that they can access content on the go, anywhere, anytime. There are substantial productivity gains by having all training content aggregated and consolidated in one place. MyGuide creates a valuable jumping-off point for users to navigate new applications and works with any type of application. Thus, exploring a new application's homepage becomes much easier and more engaging. Employees learn workflows more quickly if guides are interactive and embedded within the application. Search Insights MyGuide provides valuable insights into how users perform within an application, as well as the content and the application itself. For example, the search data from an organisation tells them what training areas are in demand. User Engagement Insights Change managers can gain an in-depth understanding of the usage data of each specific application and how it is performing via pages, features, workflows, and funnel intelligence. This allows companies to delve deeper into the overall employee experience to empower higher levels of efficiency. Usage data helps paint a better picture of the onboarding process, the customer journey, and how different types of users interact with an application. Measurable impact Increased System Proficiency Westpac saw an uptick in system proficiency using analytics to monitor guides and user engagement. With a simple view of analytics, they could use the information to drive business decisions across various projects and understand what works best. Insightful dashboards support leaders at Westpac and their goal to get users more engaged. Productivity with Insights During certain events, such as internal restructuring, implementation of new technology, events, or including a manager in a critical process, MyGuide was able to provide contextual insights on adoption and productivity to functional leaders.

Three key lessons when leading through change

Blog Post

Three key lessons when leading through change

From the financial crisis of 2008, Brexit, COVID and this year the war in Ukraine – the business world has had its fair share of shifting moments during my tenure at Cornerstone. I’ve learnt that as a business leader during these times, roles and responsibilities need to be navigated cautiously. It takes careful skill and preparation to communicate humbleness without glorifying or glossing over the events or disruption in question, and while no leader ever wants to experience these events first-hand, they do need to be seen as stepping up to the challenge for the sake of the workforce. Having taken Cornerstone through some of these disruptive events in my tenure as a leader, I’ve encountered many challenges and learnt lessons along the way when it comes to leading through disruption. Here are three key lessons that I’ve learnt along the way: Taking the high ground Being seen and heard and keeping communication lines open so that employees and stakeholders feel an element of comfort is crucial. Virtual meetings and communication tools has made this easier than ever to be the visible leader that people want. If an event has a direct impact on your company and your people, it’s vital to keep communication as regular as possible. Depending on the circumstances, daily, weekly, monthly or ad-hoc updates or meetings clearly help to calm anxieties amongst your workforce. Not all approaches work for all regions As Cornerstone’s Chief International Officer, I’ve come to learn that not every approach or solution works for every region. Although you want to try and be as common as possible in your strategy and action, following disruption, you also need to be different as needed. This ‘glocal’ approach ensures global effectiveness but with local relevancy and is an effective way to deal with global disruption. But to do this, you need to get the communication pathways among countries in a solid, transparent position. The reason you hire local talent in the first place is so that they can be a part of your global journey, so making sure the decision making happens at a local level is crucial. Identifying “probortunities” Most leaders want to be viewed as superheroes with the ability to solve each problem in the blink of an eye, but the reality is that every disruption is unique. Identifying “probortunities” (problems that can be viewed as opportunities) can be helpful in understanding each issue in a crisis and determining the most suitable strategy to address them. While we cannot predict the next global disruption, I believe we are better prepared as leaders to optimise agility and readiness across people and business. We are more resilient as we’ve learnt and grown from the experiences, we know it’s important to position ourselves front and centre and keep communication open and transparent, and we’ve proven that by adopting a ‘glocal’ approach in navigating disruptions we remain in touch, relevant and on strategy. Go to our e-book, “Empowering people in the age of agility”, to find out more about how business leaders can turn change into opportunity.

The fully integrated virtual learning solution

Datasheet

The fully integrated virtual learning solution

Today’s workforce is more dispersed than ever before, making the need to learn and communicate across different locations critical to business success. So your organisation needs to support your employees with learning and collaboration capabilities wherever, whenever. With Saba Meeting, you can ensure high quality virtual training and well-connected team interactions. As a fully integrated virtual classroom solution, Saba Meeting helps you create interactive and engaging virtual events with breakout sessions, desktop, split screen and video sharing, collaborative whiteboards, polling, in-session text chat, emoticons, and more.

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